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The association of sugar-sweetened beverage intake during infancy with sugar-sweetened beverage intake at 6 years of age.
Pediatrics. 2014 Sep; 134 Suppl 1:S56-62.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine whether sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake during infancy predicts SSB intake at 6 years of age.

METHODS

A longitudinal cohort analysis of 1333 US children was conducted by using data from the 2005-2007 Infant Feeding Practices Study II and the 2012 Follow-Up Study at 6 years of age. The exposure variables were maternal-reported SSB intakes during infancy. The outcome variable was maternal-reported SSB intake at age 6 years. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) for associations of SSB intake during infancy with consuming SSBs ≥1 time/day at 6 years old after controlling for baseline child's and parent's characteristics.

RESULTS

Based on maternal recall, approximately one-fifth of children consumed SSBs at least 1 time/day at age 6 years. Adjusted odds of consuming SSBs at age 6 years ≥1 time/day was significantly associated with any SSB intake during infancy (aOR, 2.22 vs none), age at SSB introduction (aOR, 2.33 for age ≥6 months and 2.01 for age <6 months vs never), and mean SSB intake during age 10 to 12 months (aOR, 2.72 for 1 to <2 times/week and 2.57 for ≥3 times/week vs none).

CONCLUSIONS

SSB intake during infancy significantly increased the likelihood of consuming SSBs ≥1 time/day at 6 years of age. Our findings suggest that infancy may be an important time for mothers to establish healthy beverage practices for their children and these findings can be used to inform intervention efforts to reduce SSB intake among children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia spark3@cdc.gov.Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25183757

Citation

Park, Sohyun, et al. "The Association of Sugar-sweetened Beverage Intake During Infancy With Sugar-sweetened Beverage Intake at 6 Years of Age." Pediatrics, vol. 134 Suppl 1, 2014, pp. S56-62.
Park S, Pan L, Sherry B, et al. The association of sugar-sweetened beverage intake during infancy with sugar-sweetened beverage intake at 6 years of age. Pediatrics. 2014;134 Suppl 1:S56-62.
Park, S., Pan, L., Sherry, B., & Li, R. (2014). The association of sugar-sweetened beverage intake during infancy with sugar-sweetened beverage intake at 6 years of age. Pediatrics, 134 Suppl 1, S56-62. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2014-0646J
Park S, et al. The Association of Sugar-sweetened Beverage Intake During Infancy With Sugar-sweetened Beverage Intake at 6 Years of Age. Pediatrics. 2014;134 Suppl 1:S56-62. PubMed PMID: 25183757.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The association of sugar-sweetened beverage intake during infancy with sugar-sweetened beverage intake at 6 years of age. AU - Park,Sohyun, AU - Pan,Liping, AU - Sherry,Bettylou, AU - Li,Ruowei, PY - 2014/9/4/entrez PY - 2014/9/4/pubmed PY - 2014/11/7/medline KW - Infant Feeding Practice Study II KW - children KW - sugar-sweetened beverage SP - S56 EP - 62 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 134 Suppl 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine whether sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake during infancy predicts SSB intake at 6 years of age. METHODS: A longitudinal cohort analysis of 1333 US children was conducted by using data from the 2005-2007 Infant Feeding Practices Study II and the 2012 Follow-Up Study at 6 years of age. The exposure variables were maternal-reported SSB intakes during infancy. The outcome variable was maternal-reported SSB intake at age 6 years. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) for associations of SSB intake during infancy with consuming SSBs ≥1 time/day at 6 years old after controlling for baseline child's and parent's characteristics. RESULTS: Based on maternal recall, approximately one-fifth of children consumed SSBs at least 1 time/day at age 6 years. Adjusted odds of consuming SSBs at age 6 years ≥1 time/day was significantly associated with any SSB intake during infancy (aOR, 2.22 vs none), age at SSB introduction (aOR, 2.33 for age ≥6 months and 2.01 for age <6 months vs never), and mean SSB intake during age 10 to 12 months (aOR, 2.72 for 1 to <2 times/week and 2.57 for ≥3 times/week vs none). CONCLUSIONS: SSB intake during infancy significantly increased the likelihood of consuming SSBs ≥1 time/day at 6 years of age. Our findings suggest that infancy may be an important time for mothers to establish healthy beverage practices for their children and these findings can be used to inform intervention efforts to reduce SSB intake among children. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25183757/The_association_of_sugar_sweetened_beverage_intake_during_infancy_with_sugar_sweetened_beverage_intake_at_6_years_of_age_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=25183757 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -