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Intergroup Contact, Prejudicial Attitudes, and Policy Preferences: The Case of the U.S. Military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" Policy.
J Soc Psychol. 2015 Jan-Feb; 155(1):57-69.JS

Abstract

Data from 115,052 active United States military personnel were analyzed to explore links between contact with gay people and attitudes about repealing "Don't Ask, Don't Tell." Results showed that prejudice against homosexuals significantly mediated the association between contact and supporting repeal of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell"; quality of contact in the military was a stronger predictor than other measures of contact. Quality and quantity of contact interacted: more contact quantity had opposing statistical effects on policy attitudes for people experiencing high versus low quality contact. Findings are discussed in terms of contact theory, the association between intergroup attitudes and policy preferences, and practical implications for situations in which groups' access to new positions or roles is limited, and hence contact opportunities are rare.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a University of Arizona.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25185519

Citation

Harwood, Jake. "Intergroup Contact, Prejudicial Attitudes, and Policy Preferences: the Case of the U.S. Military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" Policy." The Journal of Social Psychology, vol. 155, no. 1, 2015, pp. 57-69.
Harwood J. Intergroup Contact, Prejudicial Attitudes, and Policy Preferences: The Case of the U.S. Military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" Policy. J Soc Psychol. 2015;155(1):57-69.
Harwood, J. (2015). Intergroup Contact, Prejudicial Attitudes, and Policy Preferences: The Case of the U.S. Military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" Policy. The Journal of Social Psychology, 155(1), 57-69. https://doi.org/10.1080/00224545.2014.959886
Harwood J. Intergroup Contact, Prejudicial Attitudes, and Policy Preferences: the Case of the U.S. Military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" Policy. J Soc Psychol. 2015 Jan-Feb;155(1):57-69. PubMed PMID: 25185519.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intergroup Contact, Prejudicial Attitudes, and Policy Preferences: The Case of the U.S. Military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" Policy. A1 - Harwood,Jake, Y1 - 2014/11/04/ PY - 2014/9/5/entrez PY - 2014/9/5/pubmed PY - 2015/10/2/medline KW - don’t tell” KW - intergroup contact KW - policy attitudes KW - prejudice KW - “don’t ask SP - 57 EP - 69 JF - The Journal of social psychology JO - J Soc Psychol VL - 155 IS - 1 N2 - Data from 115,052 active United States military personnel were analyzed to explore links between contact with gay people and attitudes about repealing "Don't Ask, Don't Tell." Results showed that prejudice against homosexuals significantly mediated the association between contact and supporting repeal of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell"; quality of contact in the military was a stronger predictor than other measures of contact. Quality and quantity of contact interacted: more contact quantity had opposing statistical effects on policy attitudes for people experiencing high versus low quality contact. Findings are discussed in terms of contact theory, the association between intergroup attitudes and policy preferences, and practical implications for situations in which groups' access to new positions or roles is limited, and hence contact opportunities are rare. SN - 0022-4545 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25185519/Intergroup_Contact_Prejudicial_Attitudes_and_Policy_Preferences:_The_Case_of_the_U_S__Military's_"Don't_Ask_Don't_Tell"_Policy_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00224545.2014.959886 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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