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Tape transfer printing of a liquid metal alloy for stretchable RF electronics.
Sensors (Basel). 2014 Sep 03; 14(9):16311-21.S

Abstract

In order to make conductors with large cross sections for low impedance radio frequency (RF) electronics, while still retaining high stretchability, liquid-alloy-based microfluidic stretchable electronics offers stretchable electronic systems the unique opportunity to combine various sensors on our bodies or organs with high-quality wireless communication with the external world (devices/systems), without sacrificing enhanced user comfort. This microfluidic approach, based on printed circuit board technology, allows large area processing of large cross section conductors and robust contacts, which can handle a lot of stretching between the embedded rigid active components and the surrounding system. Although it provides such benefits, further development is needed to realize its potential as a high throughput, cost-effective process technology. In this paper, tape transfer printing is proposed to supply a rapid prototyping batch process at low cost, albeit at a low resolution of 150 μm. In particular, isolated patterns can be obtained in a simple one-step process. Finally, a stretchable radio frequency identification (RFID) tag is demonstrated. The measured results show the robustness of the hybrid integrated system when the tag is stretched at 50% for 3000 cycles.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Angstrom Laboratory, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, Uppsala 75121, Sweden. seunghee.jeong@angstrom.uu.se.The Angstrom Laboratory, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, Uppsala 75121, Sweden. klas.hjort@angstrom.uu.se.The Angstrom Laboratory, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, Uppsala 75121, Sweden. zhigang.wu@angstrom.uu.se.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25192310

Citation

Jeong, Seung Hee, et al. "Tape Transfer Printing of a Liquid Metal Alloy for Stretchable RF Electronics." Sensors (Basel, Switzerland), vol. 14, no. 9, 2014, pp. 16311-21.
Jeong SH, Hjort K, Wu Z. Tape transfer printing of a liquid metal alloy for stretchable RF electronics. Sensors (Basel). 2014;14(9):16311-21.
Jeong, S. H., Hjort, K., & Wu, Z. (2014). Tape transfer printing of a liquid metal alloy for stretchable RF electronics. Sensors (Basel, Switzerland), 14(9), 16311-21. https://doi.org/10.3390/s140916311
Jeong SH, Hjort K, Wu Z. Tape Transfer Printing of a Liquid Metal Alloy for Stretchable RF Electronics. Sensors (Basel). 2014 Sep 3;14(9):16311-21. PubMed PMID: 25192310.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tape transfer printing of a liquid metal alloy for stretchable RF electronics. AU - Jeong,Seung Hee, AU - Hjort,Klas, AU - Wu,Zhigang, Y1 - 2014/09/03/ PY - 2014/05/31/received PY - 2014/08/22/revised PY - 2014/08/27/accepted PY - 2014/9/6/entrez PY - 2014/9/6/pubmed PY - 2014/9/6/medline SP - 16311 EP - 21 JF - Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) JO - Sensors (Basel) VL - 14 IS - 9 N2 - In order to make conductors with large cross sections for low impedance radio frequency (RF) electronics, while still retaining high stretchability, liquid-alloy-based microfluidic stretchable electronics offers stretchable electronic systems the unique opportunity to combine various sensors on our bodies or organs with high-quality wireless communication with the external world (devices/systems), without sacrificing enhanced user comfort. This microfluidic approach, based on printed circuit board technology, allows large area processing of large cross section conductors and robust contacts, which can handle a lot of stretching between the embedded rigid active components and the surrounding system. Although it provides such benefits, further development is needed to realize its potential as a high throughput, cost-effective process technology. In this paper, tape transfer printing is proposed to supply a rapid prototyping batch process at low cost, albeit at a low resolution of 150 μm. In particular, isolated patterns can be obtained in a simple one-step process. Finally, a stretchable radio frequency identification (RFID) tag is demonstrated. The measured results show the robustness of the hybrid integrated system when the tag is stretched at 50% for 3000 cycles. SN - 1424-8220 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25192310/Tape_transfer_printing_of_a_liquid_metal_alloy_for_stretchable_RF_electronics_ L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=s140916311 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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