Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Type of vegetarian diet, obesity and diabetes in adult Indian population.
Nutr J. 2014 Sep 05; 13:89.NJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

To investigate the prevalence of obesity and diabetes among adult men and women in India consuming different types of vegetarian diets compared with those consuming non-vegetarian diets.

METHODS

We used cross-sectional data of 156,317 adults aged 20-49 years who participated in India's third National Family Health Survey (2005-06). Association between types of vegetarian diet (vegan, lacto-vegetarian, lacto-ovo vegetarian, pesco-vegetarian, semi-vegetarian and non-vegetarian) and self-reported diabetes status and measured body mass index (BMI) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression adjusting for age, gender, education, household wealth, rural/urban residence, religion, caste, smoking, alcohol use, and television watching.

RESULTS

Mean BMI was lowest in pesco-vegetarians (20.3 kg/m2) and vegans (20.5 kg/m2) and highest in lacto-ovo vegetarian (21.0 kg/m2) and lacto-vegetarian (21.2 kg/m2) diets. Prevalence of diabetes varied from 0.9% (95% CI: 0.8-1.1) in person consuming lacto-vegetarian, lacto-ovo vegetarian (95% CI:0.6-1.3) and semi-vegetarian (95% CI:0.7-1.1) diets and was highest in those persons consuming a pesco-vegetarian diet (1.4%; 95% CI:1.0-2.0). Consumption of a lacto- (OR:0.67;95% CI:0.58-0.76;p < 0.01), lacto-ovo (OR:0.70; 95% CI:0.51-0.96;p = 0.03) and semi-vegetarian (OR:0.77; 95% CI:0.60-0.98; p = 0.03) diet was associated with a lower likelihood of diabetes than a non-vegetarian diet in the adjusted analyses.

CONCLUSIONS

In this large, nationally representative sample of Indian adults, lacto-, lacto-ovo and semi-vegetarian diets were associated with a lower likelihood of diabetes. These findings may assist in the development of interventions to address the growing burden of overweight/obesity and diabetes in Indian population. However, prospective studies with better measures of dietary intake and clinical measures of diabetes are needed to clarify this relationship.

Authors+Show Affiliations

South Asia Network for Chronic Disease, Public Health Foundation of India, Fourth Floor, Plot no 47, Sector 44, Gurgaon (Haryana)-122002, New Delhi, India. sutapa.agrawal@phfi.org.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25192735

Citation

Agrawal, Sutapa, et al. "Type of Vegetarian Diet, Obesity and Diabetes in Adult Indian Population." Nutrition Journal, vol. 13, 2014, p. 89.
Agrawal S, Millett CJ, Dhillon PK, et al. Type of vegetarian diet, obesity and diabetes in adult Indian population. Nutr J. 2014;13:89.
Agrawal, S., Millett, C. J., Dhillon, P. K., Subramanian, S. V., & Ebrahim, S. (2014). Type of vegetarian diet, obesity and diabetes in adult Indian population. Nutrition Journal, 13, 89. https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2891-13-89
Agrawal S, et al. Type of Vegetarian Diet, Obesity and Diabetes in Adult Indian Population. Nutr J. 2014 Sep 5;13:89. PubMed PMID: 25192735.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Type of vegetarian diet, obesity and diabetes in adult Indian population. AU - Agrawal,Sutapa, AU - Millett,Christopher J, AU - Dhillon,Preet K, AU - Subramanian,S V, AU - Ebrahim,Shah, Y1 - 2014/09/05/ PY - 2014/04/09/received PY - 2014/08/28/accepted PY - 2014/9/7/entrez PY - 2014/9/7/pubmed PY - 2015/3/31/medline SP - 89 EP - 89 JF - Nutrition journal JO - Nutr J VL - 13 N2 - BACKGROUND: To investigate the prevalence of obesity and diabetes among adult men and women in India consuming different types of vegetarian diets compared with those consuming non-vegetarian diets. METHODS: We used cross-sectional data of 156,317 adults aged 20-49 years who participated in India's third National Family Health Survey (2005-06). Association between types of vegetarian diet (vegan, lacto-vegetarian, lacto-ovo vegetarian, pesco-vegetarian, semi-vegetarian and non-vegetarian) and self-reported diabetes status and measured body mass index (BMI) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression adjusting for age, gender, education, household wealth, rural/urban residence, religion, caste, smoking, alcohol use, and television watching. RESULTS: Mean BMI was lowest in pesco-vegetarians (20.3 kg/m2) and vegans (20.5 kg/m2) and highest in lacto-ovo vegetarian (21.0 kg/m2) and lacto-vegetarian (21.2 kg/m2) diets. Prevalence of diabetes varied from 0.9% (95% CI: 0.8-1.1) in person consuming lacto-vegetarian, lacto-ovo vegetarian (95% CI:0.6-1.3) and semi-vegetarian (95% CI:0.7-1.1) diets and was highest in those persons consuming a pesco-vegetarian diet (1.4%; 95% CI:1.0-2.0). Consumption of a lacto- (OR:0.67;95% CI:0.58-0.76;p < 0.01), lacto-ovo (OR:0.70; 95% CI:0.51-0.96;p = 0.03) and semi-vegetarian (OR:0.77; 95% CI:0.60-0.98; p = 0.03) diet was associated with a lower likelihood of diabetes than a non-vegetarian diet in the adjusted analyses. CONCLUSIONS: In this large, nationally representative sample of Indian adults, lacto-, lacto-ovo and semi-vegetarian diets were associated with a lower likelihood of diabetes. These findings may assist in the development of interventions to address the growing burden of overweight/obesity and diabetes in Indian population. However, prospective studies with better measures of dietary intake and clinical measures of diabetes are needed to clarify this relationship. SN - 1475-2891 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25192735/Type_of_vegetarian_diet_obesity_and_diabetes_in_adult_Indian_population_ L2 - https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2891-13-89 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -