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Post-operative refractory cystoid macular edema in a vitrectomized eye treated with slow-release dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex).
Cutan Ocul Toxicol. 2015; 34(3):257-9.CO

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The use of a slow-release dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex) for the treatment of post-operative macular edema (ME) in a vitrectomized eye has never been used before. We herein report a case of a 70-year-old woman with post-vitrectomy ME refractory to topical, sub-tenon's and intravitreal steroid administration that responded well to the implantation of a slow-release dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex) in a previously vitrectomized eye.

METHODS

Interventional case presentation.

RESULTS

One week post-implantation, the central retinal thickness was reduced to 383 μm from 640 μm and the best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) improved to 6/36 from counting fingers (CF). At six months' follow-up visit, the improvement of the ME was sustained as indicated by the optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurements and the BCVA remained stable. No serious topical or systemic adverse events were observed from the implantation of Ozurdex in the vitrectomized eye.

CONCLUSION

The use of Ozurdex in our case resulted in rapid improvement of the post-operative resistant ME. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature demonstrating the use of the slow-release dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex) to treat post-operative ME in a vitrectomized eye.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, University of Athens , Athens , Greece and.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25198407

Citation

Georgalas, Ilias, et al. "Post-operative Refractory Cystoid Macular Edema in a Vitrectomized Eye Treated With Slow-release Dexamethasone Implant (Ozurdex)." Cutaneous and Ocular Toxicology, vol. 34, no. 3, 2015, pp. 257-9.
Georgalas I, Petrou P, Papakonstantinou D, et al. Post-operative refractory cystoid macular edema in a vitrectomized eye treated with slow-release dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex). Cutan Ocul Toxicol. 2015;34(3):257-9.
Georgalas, I., Petrou, P., Papakonstantinou, D., Droumouchtsis, V., & Tservakis, I. (2015). Post-operative refractory cystoid macular edema in a vitrectomized eye treated with slow-release dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex). Cutaneous and Ocular Toxicology, 34(3), 257-9. https://doi.org/10.3109/15569527.2014.951450
Georgalas I, et al. Post-operative Refractory Cystoid Macular Edema in a Vitrectomized Eye Treated With Slow-release Dexamethasone Implant (Ozurdex). Cutan Ocul Toxicol. 2015;34(3):257-9. PubMed PMID: 25198407.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Post-operative refractory cystoid macular edema in a vitrectomized eye treated with slow-release dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex). AU - Georgalas,Ilias, AU - Petrou,Petros, AU - Papakonstantinou,Dimitrios, AU - Droumouchtsis,Vagelis, AU - Tservakis,Ioannis, Y1 - 2014/09/08/ PY - 2014/9/9/entrez PY - 2014/9/10/pubmed PY - 2016/6/9/medline KW - Dexamethasone implant KW - Ozurdex KW - post-operative macular edema KW - vitrectomy SP - 257 EP - 9 JF - Cutaneous and ocular toxicology JO - Cutan Ocul Toxicol VL - 34 IS - 3 N2 - INTRODUCTION: The use of a slow-release dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex) for the treatment of post-operative macular edema (ME) in a vitrectomized eye has never been used before. We herein report a case of a 70-year-old woman with post-vitrectomy ME refractory to topical, sub-tenon's and intravitreal steroid administration that responded well to the implantation of a slow-release dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex) in a previously vitrectomized eye. METHODS: Interventional case presentation. RESULTS: One week post-implantation, the central retinal thickness was reduced to 383 μm from 640 μm and the best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) improved to 6/36 from counting fingers (CF). At six months' follow-up visit, the improvement of the ME was sustained as indicated by the optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurements and the BCVA remained stable. No serious topical or systemic adverse events were observed from the implantation of Ozurdex in the vitrectomized eye. CONCLUSION: The use of Ozurdex in our case resulted in rapid improvement of the post-operative resistant ME. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature demonstrating the use of the slow-release dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex) to treat post-operative ME in a vitrectomized eye. SN - 1556-9535 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25198407/Post_operative_refractory_cystoid_macular_edema_in_a_vitrectomized_eye_treated_with_slow_release_dexamethasone_implant__Ozurdex__ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/15569527.2014.951450 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -