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Three new Jurassic euharamiyidan species reinforce early divergence of mammals.
Nature. 2014 Oct 30; 514(7524):579-84.Nat

Abstract

The phylogeny of Allotheria, including Multituberculata and Haramiyida, remains unsolved and has generated contentious views on the origin and earliest evolution of mammals. Here we report three new species of a new clade, Euharamiyida, based on six well-preserved fossils from the Jurassic period of China. These fossils reveal many craniodental and postcranial features of euharamiyidans and clarify several ambiguous structures that are currently the topic of debate. Our phylogenetic analyses recognize Euharamiyida as the sister group of Multituberculata, and place Allotheria within the Mammalia. The phylogeny suggests that allotherian mammals evolved from a Late Triassic (approximately 208 million years ago) Haramiyavia-like ancestor and diversified into euharamiyidans and multituberculates with a cosmopolitan distribution, implying homologous acquisition of many craniodental and postcranial features in the two groups. Our findings also favour a Late Triassic origin of mammals in Laurasia and two independent detachment events of the middle ear bones during mammalian evolution.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1] Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100044, China [2] Department of Biology, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, Pennsylvania 15705, USA.Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100044, China.Beijing Natural History Museum, 126 Tianqiao Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100050, China.Paleontological Museum of Liaoning, Shenyang Normal University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110034, China.Division of Paleontology, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, New York 10024, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25209669

Citation

Bi, Shundong, et al. "Three New Jurassic Euharamiyidan Species Reinforce Early Divergence of Mammals." Nature, vol. 514, no. 7524, 2014, pp. 579-84.
Bi S, Wang Y, Guan J, et al. Three new Jurassic euharamiyidan species reinforce early divergence of mammals. Nature. 2014;514(7524):579-84.
Bi, S., Wang, Y., Guan, J., Sheng, X., & Meng, J. (2014). Three new Jurassic euharamiyidan species reinforce early divergence of mammals. Nature, 514(7524), 579-84. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature13718
Bi S, et al. Three New Jurassic Euharamiyidan Species Reinforce Early Divergence of Mammals. Nature. 2014 Oct 30;514(7524):579-84. PubMed PMID: 25209669.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Three new Jurassic euharamiyidan species reinforce early divergence of mammals. AU - Bi,Shundong, AU - Wang,Yuanqing, AU - Guan,Jian, AU - Sheng,Xia, AU - Meng,Jin, Y1 - 2014/09/10/ PY - 2014/04/11/received PY - 2014/07/25/accepted PY - 2014/9/12/entrez PY - 2014/9/12/pubmed PY - 2014/12/15/medline SP - 579 EP - 84 JF - Nature JO - Nature VL - 514 IS - 7524 N2 - The phylogeny of Allotheria, including Multituberculata and Haramiyida, remains unsolved and has generated contentious views on the origin and earliest evolution of mammals. Here we report three new species of a new clade, Euharamiyida, based on six well-preserved fossils from the Jurassic period of China. These fossils reveal many craniodental and postcranial features of euharamiyidans and clarify several ambiguous structures that are currently the topic of debate. Our phylogenetic analyses recognize Euharamiyida as the sister group of Multituberculata, and place Allotheria within the Mammalia. The phylogeny suggests that allotherian mammals evolved from a Late Triassic (approximately 208 million years ago) Haramiyavia-like ancestor and diversified into euharamiyidans and multituberculates with a cosmopolitan distribution, implying homologous acquisition of many craniodental and postcranial features in the two groups. Our findings also favour a Late Triassic origin of mammals in Laurasia and two independent detachment events of the middle ear bones during mammalian evolution. SN - 1476-4687 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25209669/Three_new_Jurassic_euharamiyidan_species_reinforce_early_divergence_of_mammals_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/nature13718 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -