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Bat origins of MERS-CoV supported by bat coronavirus HKU4 usage of human receptor CD26.
Cell Host Microbe. 2014 Sep 10; 16(3):328-37.CH

Abstract

The recently reported Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is phylogenetically closely related to the bat coronaviruses (BatCoVs) HKU4 and HKU5. However, the evolutionary pathway of MERS-CoV is still unclear. A receptor binding domain (RBD) in the MERS-CoV envelope-embedded spike protein specifically engages human CD26 (hCD26) to initiate viral entry. The high sequence identity in the viral spike protein prompted us to investigate if HKU4 and HKU5 can recognize hCD26 for cell entry. We found that HKU4-RBD, but not HKU5-RBD, binds to hCD26, and pseudotyped viruses embedding HKU4 spike can infect cells via hCD26 recognition. The structure of the HKU4-RBD/hCD26 complex revealed a hCD26-binding mode similar overall to that observed for MERS-RBD. HKU4-RBD, however, is less adapted to hCD26 than MERS-RBD, explaining its lower affinity for receptor binding. Our findings support a bat origin for MERS-CoV and indicate the need for surveillance of HKU4-related viruses in bats.

Authors+Show Affiliations

CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China; School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027, Anhui Province, China.Research Network of Immunity and Health, Beijing Institutes of Life Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China; School of Life Sciences, Anhui University, Hefei 230039, China.National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC), Beijing 102206, China.CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.MOH Key Laboratory of Systems Biology of Pathogens, Institute of Pathogen Biology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730, China.China-Japan Joint Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology and Molecular Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China; Division of Infectious Diseases, Advanced Clinical Research Center, Department of Infectious Diseases and Applied Immunology, Research Hospital, University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639, Japan.State Key Laboratory for Emerging Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region 999077, China; Department of Microbiology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region 999077, China.State Key Laboratory for Emerging Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region 999077, China; Department of Microbiology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region 999077, China; Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003, China.CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China; School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027, Anhui Province, China; Research Network of Immunity and Health, Beijing Institutes of Life Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China; National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC), Beijing 102206, China; Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003, China; Office of Director-General, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC), Beijing 102206, China. Electronic address: gaof@im.ac.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25211075

Citation

Wang, Qihui, et al. "Bat Origins of MERS-CoV Supported By Bat Coronavirus HKU4 Usage of Human Receptor CD26." Cell Host & Microbe, vol. 16, no. 3, 2014, pp. 328-37.
Wang Q, Qi J, Yuan Y, et al. Bat origins of MERS-CoV supported by bat coronavirus HKU4 usage of human receptor CD26. Cell Host Microbe. 2014;16(3):328-37.
Wang, Q., Qi, J., Yuan, Y., Xuan, Y., Han, P., Wan, Y., Ji, W., Li, Y., Wu, Y., Wang, J., Iwamoto, A., Woo, P. C., Yuen, K. Y., Yan, J., Lu, G., & Gao, G. F. (2014). Bat origins of MERS-CoV supported by bat coronavirus HKU4 usage of human receptor CD26. Cell Host & Microbe, 16(3), 328-37. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chom.2014.08.009
Wang Q, et al. Bat Origins of MERS-CoV Supported By Bat Coronavirus HKU4 Usage of Human Receptor CD26. Cell Host Microbe. 2014 Sep 10;16(3):328-37. PubMed PMID: 25211075.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bat origins of MERS-CoV supported by bat coronavirus HKU4 usage of human receptor CD26. AU - Wang,Qihui, AU - Qi,Jianxun, AU - Yuan,Yuan, AU - Xuan,Yifang, AU - Han,Pengcheng, AU - Wan,Yuhua, AU - Ji,Wei, AU - Li,Yan, AU - Wu,Ying, AU - Wang,Jianwei, AU - Iwamoto,Aikichi, AU - Woo,Patrick C Y, AU - Yuen,Kwok-Yung, AU - Yan,Jinghua, AU - Lu,Guangwen, AU - Gao,George F, PY - 2014/05/14/received PY - 2014/07/30/revised PY - 2014/08/22/accepted PY - 2014/9/12/entrez PY - 2014/9/12/pubmed PY - 2015/6/17/medline SP - 328 EP - 37 JF - Cell host & microbe JO - Cell Host Microbe VL - 16 IS - 3 N2 - The recently reported Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is phylogenetically closely related to the bat coronaviruses (BatCoVs) HKU4 and HKU5. However, the evolutionary pathway of MERS-CoV is still unclear. A receptor binding domain (RBD) in the MERS-CoV envelope-embedded spike protein specifically engages human CD26 (hCD26) to initiate viral entry. The high sequence identity in the viral spike protein prompted us to investigate if HKU4 and HKU5 can recognize hCD26 for cell entry. We found that HKU4-RBD, but not HKU5-RBD, binds to hCD26, and pseudotyped viruses embedding HKU4 spike can infect cells via hCD26 recognition. The structure of the HKU4-RBD/hCD26 complex revealed a hCD26-binding mode similar overall to that observed for MERS-RBD. HKU4-RBD, however, is less adapted to hCD26 than MERS-RBD, explaining its lower affinity for receptor binding. Our findings support a bat origin for MERS-CoV and indicate the need for surveillance of HKU4-related viruses in bats. SN - 1934-6069 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25211075/Bat_origins_of_MERS_CoV_supported_by_bat_coronavirus_HKU4_usage_of_human_receptor_CD26_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1931-3128(14)00301-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -