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Very extensive nonmaternal care predicts mother-infant attachment disorganization: Convergent evidence from two samples.
Dev Psychopathol. 2015 Aug; 27(3):649-61.DP

Abstract

We examined whether a maximum threshold of time spent in nonmaternal care exists, beyond which infants have an increased risk of forming a disorganized infant-mother attachment. The hours per week infants spent in nonmaternal care at 7-8 months were examined as a continuous measure and as a dichotomous threshold (over 40, 50 and 60 hr/week) to predict infant disorganization at 12-15 months. Two different samples (Austin and NICHD) were used to replicate findings and control for critical covariates: mothers' unresolved status and frightening behavior (assessed in the Austin sample, N = 125), quality of nonmaternal caregiving (assessed in the NICHD sample, N = 1,135), and family income and infant temperament (assessed in both samples). Only very extensive hours of nonmaternal care (over 60 hr/week) and mothers' frightening behavior independently predicted attachment disorganization. A polynomial logistic regression performed on the larger NICHD sample indicated that the risk of disorganized attachment exponentially increased after exceeding 60 hr/week. In addition, very extensive hours of nonmaternal care only predicted attachment disorganization after age 6 months (not prior). Findings suggest that during a sensitive period of attachment formation, infants who spend more than 60 hr/week in nonmaternal care may be at an increased risk of forming a disorganized attachment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Texas at Austin.Charles Sturt University.Arizona State University.Masaryk University.University of Texas at Austin.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25212870

Citation

Hazen, Nancy L., et al. "Very Extensive Nonmaternal Care Predicts Mother-infant Attachment Disorganization: Convergent Evidence From Two Samples." Development and Psychopathology, vol. 27, no. 3, 2015, pp. 649-61.
Hazen NL, Allen SD, Christopher CH, et al. Very extensive nonmaternal care predicts mother-infant attachment disorganization: Convergent evidence from two samples. Dev Psychopathol. 2015;27(3):649-61.
Hazen, N. L., Allen, S. D., Christopher, C. H., Umemura, T., & Jacobvitz, D. B. (2015). Very extensive nonmaternal care predicts mother-infant attachment disorganization: Convergent evidence from two samples. Development and Psychopathology, 27(3), 649-61. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954579414000893
Hazen NL, et al. Very Extensive Nonmaternal Care Predicts Mother-infant Attachment Disorganization: Convergent Evidence From Two Samples. Dev Psychopathol. 2015;27(3):649-61. PubMed PMID: 25212870.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Very extensive nonmaternal care predicts mother-infant attachment disorganization: Convergent evidence from two samples. AU - Hazen,Nancy L, AU - Allen,Sydnye D, AU - Christopher,Caroline Heaton, AU - Umemura,Tomotaka, AU - Jacobvitz,Deborah B, Y1 - 2014/09/12/ PY - 2014/9/13/entrez PY - 2014/9/13/pubmed PY - 2016/3/2/medline SP - 649 EP - 61 JF - Development and psychopathology JO - Dev. Psychopathol. VL - 27 IS - 3 N2 - We examined whether a maximum threshold of time spent in nonmaternal care exists, beyond which infants have an increased risk of forming a disorganized infant-mother attachment. The hours per week infants spent in nonmaternal care at 7-8 months were examined as a continuous measure and as a dichotomous threshold (over 40, 50 and 60 hr/week) to predict infant disorganization at 12-15 months. Two different samples (Austin and NICHD) were used to replicate findings and control for critical covariates: mothers' unresolved status and frightening behavior (assessed in the Austin sample, N = 125), quality of nonmaternal caregiving (assessed in the NICHD sample, N = 1,135), and family income and infant temperament (assessed in both samples). Only very extensive hours of nonmaternal care (over 60 hr/week) and mothers' frightening behavior independently predicted attachment disorganization. A polynomial logistic regression performed on the larger NICHD sample indicated that the risk of disorganized attachment exponentially increased after exceeding 60 hr/week. In addition, very extensive hours of nonmaternal care only predicted attachment disorganization after age 6 months (not prior). Findings suggest that during a sensitive period of attachment formation, infants who spend more than 60 hr/week in nonmaternal care may be at an increased risk of forming a disorganized attachment. SN - 1469-2198 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25212870/Very_extensive_nonmaternal_care_predicts_mother_infant_attachment_disorganization:_Convergent_evidence_from_two_samples_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0954579414000893/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -