Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Evidence that environmental and genetic risks for psychotic disorder may operate by impacting on connections between core symptoms of perceptual alteration and delusional ideation.
Schizophr Bull. 2015 May; 41(3):687-97.SB

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Relational models of psychopathology propose that symptoms are dynamically connected and hypothesize that genetic and environmental influences moderate the strength of these symptom connections. Previous findings suggest that the interplay between hallucinations and delusions may play a crucial role in the development of psychotic disorder. The current study examined whether the connection between hallucinations and delusions is impacted by proxy genetic and environmental risk factors.

METHODS

Hallucinations and delusions at baseline and at 3-year follow-up were assessed in a sample of 1054 healthy siblings and 918 parents of 1109 patients with psychosis, and in 589 healthy controls (no familial psychosis risk). Environmental factors assessed were cannabis use, childhood trauma, and urbanicity during childhood. Logistic regression analyses tested whether familial psychosis risk predicted increased risk of delusions, given presence of hallucinations. Moderating effects of environmental factors on the hallucination-delusion association were tested in a similar fashion, restricted to the control and sibling groups.

RESULTS

The risk of delusions, given hallucinations, was associated with proxy genetic risk: 53% in parents, 47% in siblings, and 36% in controls. The hallucination-delusion association was stronger in those reporting cannabis use (risk difference: 32%) and childhood trauma (risk difference: 15%) although not all associations were statistically conclusive (respectively: p = .037; p = .054). A directionally similar but nonsignificant effect was found for urb anicity during childhood (risk difference: 14%, p =.357).

CONCLUSION

The strength of the connection between delusions and hallucinations is associated with familial and environmental risks for psychotic disorder, suggesting that specific symptom connections in the early psychosis psychopathology network are informative of underlying mechanisms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, South Limburg Mental Health Research and Teaching Network, EURON, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands;Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, South Limburg Mental Health Research and Teaching Network, EURON, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands;Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, South Limburg Mental Health Research and Teaching Network, EURON, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands;Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, South Limburg Mental Health Research and Teaching Network, EURON, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands;No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25217481

Citation

Smeets, Feikje, et al. "Evidence That Environmental and Genetic Risks for Psychotic Disorder May Operate By Impacting On Connections Between Core Symptoms of Perceptual Alteration and Delusional Ideation." Schizophrenia Bulletin, vol. 41, no. 3, 2015, pp. 687-97.
Smeets F, Lataster T, Viechtbauer W, et al. Evidence that environmental and genetic risks for psychotic disorder may operate by impacting on connections between core symptoms of perceptual alteration and delusional ideation. Schizophr Bull. 2015;41(3):687-97.
Smeets, F., Lataster, T., Viechtbauer, W., & Delespaul, P. (2015). Evidence that environmental and genetic risks for psychotic disorder may operate by impacting on connections between core symptoms of perceptual alteration and delusional ideation. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 41(3), 687-97. https://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbu122
Smeets F, et al. Evidence That Environmental and Genetic Risks for Psychotic Disorder May Operate By Impacting On Connections Between Core Symptoms of Perceptual Alteration and Delusional Ideation. Schizophr Bull. 2015;41(3):687-97. PubMed PMID: 25217481.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evidence that environmental and genetic risks for psychotic disorder may operate by impacting on connections between core symptoms of perceptual alteration and delusional ideation. AU - Smeets,Feikje, AU - Lataster,Tineke, AU - Viechtbauer,Wolfgang, AU - Delespaul,Philippe, AU - ,, Y1 - 2014/09/12/ PY - 2014/9/14/entrez PY - 2014/9/14/pubmed PY - 2016/1/30/medline KW - delusions KW - hallucinations KW - psychosis SP - 687 EP - 97 JF - Schizophrenia bulletin JO - Schizophr Bull VL - 41 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Relational models of psychopathology propose that symptoms are dynamically connected and hypothesize that genetic and environmental influences moderate the strength of these symptom connections. Previous findings suggest that the interplay between hallucinations and delusions may play a crucial role in the development of psychotic disorder. The current study examined whether the connection between hallucinations and delusions is impacted by proxy genetic and environmental risk factors. METHODS: Hallucinations and delusions at baseline and at 3-year follow-up were assessed in a sample of 1054 healthy siblings and 918 parents of 1109 patients with psychosis, and in 589 healthy controls (no familial psychosis risk). Environmental factors assessed were cannabis use, childhood trauma, and urbanicity during childhood. Logistic regression analyses tested whether familial psychosis risk predicted increased risk of delusions, given presence of hallucinations. Moderating effects of environmental factors on the hallucination-delusion association were tested in a similar fashion, restricted to the control and sibling groups. RESULTS: The risk of delusions, given hallucinations, was associated with proxy genetic risk: 53% in parents, 47% in siblings, and 36% in controls. The hallucination-delusion association was stronger in those reporting cannabis use (risk difference: 32%) and childhood trauma (risk difference: 15%) although not all associations were statistically conclusive (respectively: p = .037; p = .054). A directionally similar but nonsignificant effect was found for urb anicity during childhood (risk difference: 14%, p =.357). CONCLUSION: The strength of the connection between delusions and hallucinations is associated with familial and environmental risks for psychotic disorder, suggesting that specific symptom connections in the early psychosis psychopathology network are informative of underlying mechanisms. SN - 1745-1701 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25217481/Evidence_that_environmental_and_genetic_risks_for_psychotic_disorder_may_operate_by_impacting_on_connections_between_core_symptoms_of_perceptual_alteration_and_delusional_ideation_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/schizophreniabulletin/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/schbul/sbu122 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -