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The long-term effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on verbal working memory: an fMRI study of young adults.
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2014 Nov 01; 144:61-9.DA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the long-term effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on verbal working memory were investigated in young adults. Participants were members of the Ottawa Prenatal Prospective Study, a longitudinal study that collected a unique body of information on participants from infancy to young adulthood. This allowed for the measurement of an unprecedented number of potentially confounding drug exposure variables including: prenatal marijuana and alcohol exposure and current marijuana, nicotine and alcohol use.

METHODS

Twelve young adults with prenatal nicotine exposure and 13 non-exposed controls performed a 2-Back working memory task while fMRI blood oxygen level-dependent responses were examined. Despite similar task performance, participants with more prenatal nicotine exposure demonstrated significantly greater activity in several regions of the brain that typically subserve verbal working memory including the middle frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, the inferior parietal lobe and the cingulate gyrus.

RESULTS

These results suggest that prenatal nicotine exposure contributes to altered neural functioning during verbal working memory that continues into adulthood. Working memory is critical for a wide range of cognitive skills such as language comprehension, learning and reasoning.

CONCLUSION

Thus, these findings highlight the need for continued educational programs and public awareness campaigns to reduce tobacco use among pregnant women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Ottawa, School of Psychology, Canada. Electronic address: clong090@uottawa.ca.University of Ottawa, School of Psychology, Canada.University of Ottawa, School of Psychology, Canada.University of Ottawa, School of Psychology, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25218661

Citation

A Longo, Carmelinda, et al. "The Long-term Effects of Prenatal Nicotine Exposure On Verbal Working Memory: an fMRI Study of Young Adults." Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 144, 2014, pp. 61-9.
A Longo C, A Fried P, Cameron I, et al. The long-term effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on verbal working memory: an fMRI study of young adults. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2014;144:61-9.
A Longo, C., A Fried, P., Cameron, I., & M Smith, A. (2014). The long-term effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on verbal working memory: an fMRI study of young adults. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 144, 61-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.08.006
A Longo C, et al. The Long-term Effects of Prenatal Nicotine Exposure On Verbal Working Memory: an fMRI Study of Young Adults. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2014 Nov 1;144:61-9. PubMed PMID: 25218661.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The long-term effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on verbal working memory: an fMRI study of young adults. AU - A Longo,Carmelinda, AU - A Fried,Peter, AU - Cameron,Ian, AU - M Smith,Andra, Y1 - 2014/08/18/ PY - 2014/03/13/received PY - 2014/08/06/revised PY - 2014/08/07/accepted PY - 2014/9/15/entrez PY - 2014/9/15/pubmed PY - 2015/10/31/medline KW - Prenatal nicotine exposure KW - Verbal working memory KW - Young adults KW - fMRI SP - 61 EP - 9 JF - Drug and alcohol dependence JO - Drug Alcohol Depend VL - 144 N2 - BACKGROUND: Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the long-term effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on verbal working memory were investigated in young adults. Participants were members of the Ottawa Prenatal Prospective Study, a longitudinal study that collected a unique body of information on participants from infancy to young adulthood. This allowed for the measurement of an unprecedented number of potentially confounding drug exposure variables including: prenatal marijuana and alcohol exposure and current marijuana, nicotine and alcohol use. METHODS: Twelve young adults with prenatal nicotine exposure and 13 non-exposed controls performed a 2-Back working memory task while fMRI blood oxygen level-dependent responses were examined. Despite similar task performance, participants with more prenatal nicotine exposure demonstrated significantly greater activity in several regions of the brain that typically subserve verbal working memory including the middle frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, the inferior parietal lobe and the cingulate gyrus. RESULTS: These results suggest that prenatal nicotine exposure contributes to altered neural functioning during verbal working memory that continues into adulthood. Working memory is critical for a wide range of cognitive skills such as language comprehension, learning and reasoning. CONCLUSION: Thus, these findings highlight the need for continued educational programs and public awareness campaigns to reduce tobacco use among pregnant women. SN - 1879-0046 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25218661/The_long_term_effects_of_prenatal_nicotine_exposure_on_verbal_working_memory:_an_fMRI_study_of_young_adults_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0376-8716(14)01034-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -