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Adolescent meat intake and breast cancer risk.
Int J Cancer 2015; 136(8):1909-20IJ

Abstract

The breast is particularly vulnerable to carcinogenic influences during adolescence due to rapid proliferation of mammary cells and lack of terminal differentiation. We investigated consumption of adolescent red meat and other protein sources in relation to breast cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study II cohort. We followed prospectively 44,231 women aged 33-52 years who, in 1998, completed a detailed questionnaire about diet during adolescence. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression. We documented 1132 breast cancer cases during 13-year follow-up. In multivariable Cox regression models with major breast cancer risk factors adjustment, greater consumption of total red meat in adolescence was significantly associated with higher premenopausal breast cancer risk (highest vs. lowest quintiles, RR, 1.43; 95%CI, 1.05-1.94; Ptrend = 0.007), but not postmenopausal breast cancer. Adolescent intake of poultry was associated with lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.76; 95%CI, 0.60-0.97; for each serving/day). Adolescent intakes of iron, heme iron, fish, eggs, legumes and nuts were not associated with breast cancer. Replacement of one serving/day of total red meat with one serving of combination of poultry, fish, legumes, and nuts was associated with a 15% lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.85; 95%CI, 0.74-0.96) and a 23% lower risk of premenopausal breast cancer (RR, 0.77; 95%CI, 0.64-0.92). In conclusion, higher consumption of red meat during adolescence was associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Substituting other dietary protein sources for red meat in adolescent diet may decrease premenopausal breast cancer risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Department of Community Nutrition, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and Food Technology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25220168

Citation

Farvid, Maryam S., et al. "Adolescent Meat Intake and Breast Cancer Risk." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 136, no. 8, 2015, pp. 1909-20.
Farvid MS, Cho E, Chen WY, et al. Adolescent meat intake and breast cancer risk. Int J Cancer. 2015;136(8):1909-20.
Farvid, M. S., Cho, E., Chen, W. Y., Eliassen, A. H., & Willett, W. C. (2015). Adolescent meat intake and breast cancer risk. International Journal of Cancer, 136(8), pp. 1909-20. doi:10.1002/ijc.29218.
Farvid MS, et al. Adolescent Meat Intake and Breast Cancer Risk. Int J Cancer. 2015 Apr 15;136(8):1909-20. PubMed PMID: 25220168.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adolescent meat intake and breast cancer risk. AU - Farvid,Maryam S, AU - Cho,Eunyoung, AU - Chen,Wendy Y, AU - Eliassen,A Heather, AU - Willett,Walter C, Y1 - 2014/10/03/ PY - 2014/01/05/received PY - 2014/08/26/revised PY - 2014/08/28/accepted PY - 2014/9/16/entrez PY - 2014/9/16/pubmed PY - 2015/4/17/medline SP - 1909 EP - 20 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 136 IS - 8 N2 - The breast is particularly vulnerable to carcinogenic influences during adolescence due to rapid proliferation of mammary cells and lack of terminal differentiation. We investigated consumption of adolescent red meat and other protein sources in relation to breast cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study II cohort. We followed prospectively 44,231 women aged 33-52 years who, in 1998, completed a detailed questionnaire about diet during adolescence. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression. We documented 1132 breast cancer cases during 13-year follow-up. In multivariable Cox regression models with major breast cancer risk factors adjustment, greater consumption of total red meat in adolescence was significantly associated with higher premenopausal breast cancer risk (highest vs. lowest quintiles, RR, 1.43; 95%CI, 1.05-1.94; Ptrend = 0.007), but not postmenopausal breast cancer. Adolescent intake of poultry was associated with lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.76; 95%CI, 0.60-0.97; for each serving/day). Adolescent intakes of iron, heme iron, fish, eggs, legumes and nuts were not associated with breast cancer. Replacement of one serving/day of total red meat with one serving of combination of poultry, fish, legumes, and nuts was associated with a 15% lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.85; 95%CI, 0.74-0.96) and a 23% lower risk of premenopausal breast cancer (RR, 0.77; 95%CI, 0.64-0.92). In conclusion, higher consumption of red meat during adolescence was associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Substituting other dietary protein sources for red meat in adolescent diet may decrease premenopausal breast cancer risk. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25220168/Adolescent_meat_intake_and_breast_cancer_risk_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.29218 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -