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Coping with future epidemics: Tai chi practice as an overcoming strategy used by survivors of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in post-SARS Hong Kong.
Health Expect. 2016 06; 19(3):762-72.HE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although SARS had been with a controversial topic for a decade at the time of this study, numerous SARS survivors had not yet physically, psychologically or socially recovered from the aftermath of SARS. Among chronically ill patients, the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is reported to be widespread. However, extremely little is known about the use of CAM by SARS survivors in the post-SARS period and even less is known about how the use of CAM is related to the unpleasant social and medical-treatment experiences of SARS survivors, their eagerness to re-establish social networks, and their awareness to prepare for future epidemics.

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the motivations for practising tai chi among SARS survivors in post-SARS Hong Kong.

DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS

Using a qualitative approach, I conducted individual semi-structured interviews with 35 SARS survivors, who were purposively sampled from a tai chi class of a SARS-patient self-help group in Hong Kong.

RESULTS

Health concerns and social experiences motivated the participants to practise tai chi in post-SARS Hong Kong. Experiencing health deterioration in relation to SARS-associated sequelae, coping with unpleasant experiences during follow-up biomedical treatments, a desire to regain an active role in recovery and rehabilitation, overcoming SARS-associated stigmas by establishing a new social network and preparing for potential future stigmatization and discrimination were the key motivators for them.

CONCLUSION

The participants practised tai chi not only because they sought to improve their health but also because it provided a crucial social function and meaning to them.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Applied Social Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25220505

Citation

Siu, Judy Yuen-Man. "Coping With Future Epidemics: Tai Chi Practice as an Overcoming Strategy Used By Survivors of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in post-SARS Hong Kong." Health Expectations : an International Journal of Public Participation in Health Care and Health Policy, vol. 19, no. 3, 2016, pp. 762-72.
Siu JY. Coping with future epidemics: Tai chi practice as an overcoming strategy used by survivors of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in post-SARS Hong Kong. Health Expect. 2016;19(3):762-72.
Siu, J. Y. (2016). Coping with future epidemics: Tai chi practice as an overcoming strategy used by survivors of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in post-SARS Hong Kong. Health Expectations : an International Journal of Public Participation in Health Care and Health Policy, 19(3), 762-72. https://doi.org/10.1111/hex.12270
Siu JY. Coping With Future Epidemics: Tai Chi Practice as an Overcoming Strategy Used By Survivors of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in post-SARS Hong Kong. Health Expect. 2016;19(3):762-72. PubMed PMID: 25220505.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coping with future epidemics: Tai chi practice as an overcoming strategy used by survivors of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in post-SARS Hong Kong. A1 - Siu,Judy Yuen-Man, Y1 - 2014/09/15/ PY - 2014/08/26/accepted PY - 2014/9/16/entrez PY - 2014/9/16/pubmed PY - 2018/3/10/medline KW - Hong Kong KW - SARS survivors KW - Tai chi KW - overcoming strategy KW - post-SARS SP - 762 EP - 72 JF - Health expectations : an international journal of public participation in health care and health policy JO - Health Expect VL - 19 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although SARS had been with a controversial topic for a decade at the time of this study, numerous SARS survivors had not yet physically, psychologically or socially recovered from the aftermath of SARS. Among chronically ill patients, the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is reported to be widespread. However, extremely little is known about the use of CAM by SARS survivors in the post-SARS period and even less is known about how the use of CAM is related to the unpleasant social and medical-treatment experiences of SARS survivors, their eagerness to re-establish social networks, and their awareness to prepare for future epidemics. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the motivations for practising tai chi among SARS survivors in post-SARS Hong Kong. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Using a qualitative approach, I conducted individual semi-structured interviews with 35 SARS survivors, who were purposively sampled from a tai chi class of a SARS-patient self-help group in Hong Kong. RESULTS: Health concerns and social experiences motivated the participants to practise tai chi in post-SARS Hong Kong. Experiencing health deterioration in relation to SARS-associated sequelae, coping with unpleasant experiences during follow-up biomedical treatments, a desire to regain an active role in recovery and rehabilitation, overcoming SARS-associated stigmas by establishing a new social network and preparing for potential future stigmatization and discrimination were the key motivators for them. CONCLUSION: The participants practised tai chi not only because they sought to improve their health but also because it provided a crucial social function and meaning to them. SN - 1369-7625 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25220505/Coping_with_future_epidemics:_Tai_chi_practice_as_an_overcoming_strategy_used_by_survivors_of_severe_acute_respiratory_syndrome__SARS__in_post_SARS_Hong_Kong_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/hex.12270 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -