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Ceftaroline activity tested against bacterial isolates from pediatric patients: results from the assessing worldwide antimicrobial resistance and evaluation program for the United States (2011-2012).
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2014 Aug; 33(8):837-42.PI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Ceftaroline, the active form of ceftaroline fosamil, is a cephalosporin with broad-spectrum bactericidal activity against resistant Gram-positive organisms, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, ceftriaxone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and many Enterobacteriaceae species. Ceftaroline fosamil is approved in the United States for treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in adults.

METHODS

A total of 5291 consecutive unique pediatric patient strains of clinical significance were collected from 157 US medical centers. The isolates were identified locally and forwarded to a central monitoring laboratory for reference antimicrobial susceptibility testing. S. pneumoniae isolates from the 2011 to 2012 respiratory season were serotyped. Susceptibility results were analyzed according to patient age as follows: ≤ 1 years old (yo; 1857 strains); 2-5 (1342); 6-12 (1281) and 13-17 (811).

RESULTS

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus rates were slightly lower in isolates from patients 13-17 yo (39.9%) compared with other age groups (48.2-51.5%), and ceftaroline was consistently active against S. aureus isolates from all 4 age groups [minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC50/90): 0.25-05/1 μg/mL; 99.8-100.0% susceptible]. Overall, 99.8% of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were ceftaroline susceptible (MIC50/90: 0.5/1 μg/mL). All S. pneumoniae strains (1178) were ceftaroline susceptible (MIC50/90: ≤ 0.015/0.12 μg/mL), whereas ceftriaxone susceptibility varied from only 84.8 (≤ 1 yo) to 89.7% (13-17 yo). 19A was the most frequent serotype identified among S. pneumoniae and these isolates exhibited low susceptibility to ceftriaxone (42.4%) and most other antimicrobials tested. The highest ceftaroline MIC among Haemophilus influenzae (587 strains) was 0.12 μg/mL (100.0% susceptible), and β-lactamase production rates varied from 24.2 (13-17 yo) to 30.1% (6-12 yo); 27.9% overall. Ceftaroline was also active against β-hemolytic streptococci (556 strains, highest MIC, 0.06 μg/mL). Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-phenotype rates among Escherichia coli/Klebsiella spp. were 6.0/5.1, 11.0/11.5, 5.1/8.3 and 11.4/14.7% for the ≤ 1, 2-5, 6-12 and 13-17 yo age groups, respectively. Ceftaroline exhibited good activity against non-ESBL phenotype strains of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. (MIC90: 0.25 μg/mL for both organisms), but had limited activity against ESBL-producing strains.

CONCLUSION

Ceftaroline demonstrated potent in vitro activity when tested against S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, β-hemolytic streptococci and non-ESBL-phenotype E. coli and Klebsiella spp. strains isolated from pediatric patients, independent of patient age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the JMI Laboratories, North Liberty, IA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25222304

Citation

Sader, Helio S., et al. "Ceftaroline Activity Tested Against Bacterial Isolates From Pediatric Patients: Results From the Assessing Worldwide Antimicrobial Resistance and Evaluation Program for the United States (2011-2012)." The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, vol. 33, no. 8, 2014, pp. 837-42.
Sader HS, Mendes RE, Farrell DJ, et al. Ceftaroline activity tested against bacterial isolates from pediatric patients: results from the assessing worldwide antimicrobial resistance and evaluation program for the United States (2011-2012). Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2014;33(8):837-42.
Sader, H. S., Mendes, R. E., Farrell, D. J., Flamm, R. K., & Jones, R. N. (2014). Ceftaroline activity tested against bacterial isolates from pediatric patients: results from the assessing worldwide antimicrobial resistance and evaluation program for the United States (2011-2012). The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 33(8), 837-42. https://doi.org/10.1097/INF.0000000000000307
Sader HS, et al. Ceftaroline Activity Tested Against Bacterial Isolates From Pediatric Patients: Results From the Assessing Worldwide Antimicrobial Resistance and Evaluation Program for the United States (2011-2012). Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2014;33(8):837-42. PubMed PMID: 25222304.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ceftaroline activity tested against bacterial isolates from pediatric patients: results from the assessing worldwide antimicrobial resistance and evaluation program for the United States (2011-2012). AU - Sader,Helio S, AU - Mendes,Rodrigo E, AU - Farrell,David J, AU - Flamm,Robert K, AU - Jones,Ronald N, PY - 2014/9/16/entrez PY - 2014/9/16/pubmed PY - 2015/6/30/medline SP - 837 EP - 42 JF - The Pediatric infectious disease journal JO - Pediatr Infect Dis J VL - 33 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Ceftaroline, the active form of ceftaroline fosamil, is a cephalosporin with broad-spectrum bactericidal activity against resistant Gram-positive organisms, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, ceftriaxone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and many Enterobacteriaceae species. Ceftaroline fosamil is approved in the United States for treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in adults. METHODS: A total of 5291 consecutive unique pediatric patient strains of clinical significance were collected from 157 US medical centers. The isolates were identified locally and forwarded to a central monitoring laboratory for reference antimicrobial susceptibility testing. S. pneumoniae isolates from the 2011 to 2012 respiratory season were serotyped. Susceptibility results were analyzed according to patient age as follows: ≤ 1 years old (yo; 1857 strains); 2-5 (1342); 6-12 (1281) and 13-17 (811). RESULTS: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus rates were slightly lower in isolates from patients 13-17 yo (39.9%) compared with other age groups (48.2-51.5%), and ceftaroline was consistently active against S. aureus isolates from all 4 age groups [minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC50/90): 0.25-05/1 μg/mL; 99.8-100.0% susceptible]. Overall, 99.8% of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were ceftaroline susceptible (MIC50/90: 0.5/1 μg/mL). All S. pneumoniae strains (1178) were ceftaroline susceptible (MIC50/90: ≤ 0.015/0.12 μg/mL), whereas ceftriaxone susceptibility varied from only 84.8 (≤ 1 yo) to 89.7% (13-17 yo). 19A was the most frequent serotype identified among S. pneumoniae and these isolates exhibited low susceptibility to ceftriaxone (42.4%) and most other antimicrobials tested. The highest ceftaroline MIC among Haemophilus influenzae (587 strains) was 0.12 μg/mL (100.0% susceptible), and β-lactamase production rates varied from 24.2 (13-17 yo) to 30.1% (6-12 yo); 27.9% overall. Ceftaroline was also active against β-hemolytic streptococci (556 strains, highest MIC, 0.06 μg/mL). Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-phenotype rates among Escherichia coli/Klebsiella spp. were 6.0/5.1, 11.0/11.5, 5.1/8.3 and 11.4/14.7% for the ≤ 1, 2-5, 6-12 and 13-17 yo age groups, respectively. Ceftaroline exhibited good activity against non-ESBL phenotype strains of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. (MIC90: 0.25 μg/mL for both organisms), but had limited activity against ESBL-producing strains. CONCLUSION: Ceftaroline demonstrated potent in vitro activity when tested against S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, β-hemolytic streptococci and non-ESBL-phenotype E. coli and Klebsiella spp. strains isolated from pediatric patients, independent of patient age. SN - 1532-0987 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25222304/Ceftaroline_activity_tested_against_bacterial_isolates_from_pediatric_patients:_results_from_the_assessing_worldwide_antimicrobial_resistance_and_evaluation_program_for_the_United_States__2011_2012__ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/INF.0000000000000307 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -