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The aetiology of anaemia during pregnancy: a study to evaluate the contribution of iron deficiency and common infections in pregnant Ugandan women.
Public Health Nutr. 2015 Jun; 18(8):1423-35.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe the aetiology of anaemia in pregnant Ugandan women and explore Fe deficiency and common infections as contributors to anaemia in this population.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study in which Hb, ferritin, transferrin receptor (sTfR), C-reactive protein, α-1 acid glycoprotein, hepcidin, malaria, hookworm infestation, syphilis and Helicobacter pylori infection were assessed.

SETTING

Antenatal care clinic at Kawempe Health Centre, Kampala, Uganda.

SUBJECTS

HIV-negative women (n 151) in their first or second pregnancy at 10-16 weeks' gestation.

RESULTS

The prevalence of anaemia was 29·1 %. Fe deficiency was 40·4 % and 14·6 % based on ferritin 8·3 μg/ml. The prevalence of Fe-deficiency anaemia was 9·3 % based on ferritin 8·3 μg/ml. Hepcidin concentration was positively correlated with ferritin concentration (n 151, r=0·578, P1 g/l and/or C-reactive protein >5 mg/l. Malaria parasitaemia (OR=6·85; 95 % CI 1·25, 37·41, P=0·026) and Fe deficiency defined using sTfR (OR=5·58; 95 % CI 1·26, 24·80, P=0·024) were independently and positively associated with anaemia. Population-attributable risk factors for anaemia for raised C-reactive protein, Fe deficiency defined by sTfR >8·3 μg/ml and presence of malaria parasites were 41·6 (95 % CI 11·1, 72·2) %, 13·5 (95 % CI 2·0, 25·0) % and 12·0 (95 % CI 1·4, 22·6) %, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Infections and inflammation are of greater significance than Fe deficiency in the aetiology of anaemia in pregnant Ugandan women during the first trimester.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Department of Biochemistry and Sports Science,College of Natural Sciences,Makerere University,PO Box 7062,Kampala,Uganda.1Department of Biochemistry and Sports Science,College of Natural Sciences,Makerere University,PO Box 7062,Kampala,Uganda.2Department of Laboratory Medicine,Radboud University Medical Center,Nijmegen,The Netherlands.2Department of Laboratory Medicine,Radboud University Medical Center,Nijmegen,The Netherlands.3Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research,Food and Nutrition Program,Environment and Life Sciences Research Center,Kuwait.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25222882

Citation

Baingana, Rhona K., et al. "The Aetiology of Anaemia During Pregnancy: a Study to Evaluate the Contribution of Iron Deficiency and Common Infections in Pregnant Ugandan Women." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 18, no. 8, 2015, pp. 1423-35.
Baingana RK, Enyaru JK, Tjalsma H, et al. The aetiology of anaemia during pregnancy: a study to evaluate the contribution of iron deficiency and common infections in pregnant Ugandan women. Public Health Nutr. 2015;18(8):1423-35.
Baingana, R. K., Enyaru, J. K., Tjalsma, H., Swinkels, D. W., & Davidsson, L. (2015). The aetiology of anaemia during pregnancy: a study to evaluate the contribution of iron deficiency and common infections in pregnant Ugandan women. Public Health Nutrition, 18(8), 1423-35. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980014001888
Baingana RK, et al. The Aetiology of Anaemia During Pregnancy: a Study to Evaluate the Contribution of Iron Deficiency and Common Infections in Pregnant Ugandan Women. Public Health Nutr. 2015;18(8):1423-35. PubMed PMID: 25222882.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The aetiology of anaemia during pregnancy: a study to evaluate the contribution of iron deficiency and common infections in pregnant Ugandan women. AU - Baingana,Rhona K, AU - Enyaru,John K, AU - Tjalsma,Harold, AU - Swinkels,Dorine W, AU - Davidsson,Lena, Y1 - 2014/09/15/ PY - 2014/9/16/entrez PY - 2014/9/16/pubmed PY - 2016/4/26/medline KW - Uganda SP - 1423 EP - 35 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 18 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To describe the aetiology of anaemia in pregnant Ugandan women and explore Fe deficiency and common infections as contributors to anaemia in this population. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study in which Hb, ferritin, transferrin receptor (sTfR), C-reactive protein, α-1 acid glycoprotein, hepcidin, malaria, hookworm infestation, syphilis and Helicobacter pylori infection were assessed. SETTING: Antenatal care clinic at Kawempe Health Centre, Kampala, Uganda. SUBJECTS: HIV-negative women (n 151) in their first or second pregnancy at 10-16 weeks' gestation. RESULTS: The prevalence of anaemia was 29·1 %. Fe deficiency was 40·4 % and 14·6 % based on ferritin 8·3 μg/ml. The prevalence of Fe-deficiency anaemia was 9·3 % based on ferritin 8·3 μg/ml. Hepcidin concentration was positively correlated with ferritin concentration (n 151, r=0·578, P1 g/l and/or C-reactive protein >5 mg/l. Malaria parasitaemia (OR=6·85; 95 % CI 1·25, 37·41, P=0·026) and Fe deficiency defined using sTfR (OR=5·58; 95 % CI 1·26, 24·80, P=0·024) were independently and positively associated with anaemia. Population-attributable risk factors for anaemia for raised C-reactive protein, Fe deficiency defined by sTfR >8·3 μg/ml and presence of malaria parasites were 41·6 (95 % CI 11·1, 72·2) %, 13·5 (95 % CI 2·0, 25·0) % and 12·0 (95 % CI 1·4, 22·6) %, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Infections and inflammation are of greater significance than Fe deficiency in the aetiology of anaemia in pregnant Ugandan women during the first trimester. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25222882/The_aetiology_of_anaemia_during_pregnancy:_a_study_to_evaluate_the_contribution_of_iron_deficiency_and_common_infections_in_pregnant_Ugandan_women_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980014001888/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -