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Physical activity, energy intake and the risk of incident kidney stones.
J Urol 2015; 193(3):864-8JU

Abstract

PURPOSE

Recent data suggest that higher physical activity and lower energy intake may be associated with a lower risk of kidney stones. To our knowledge whether these associations could be reproduced in other study populations after accounting for life-style and dietary factors is not known.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We analyzed data on 3 large prospective cohorts, including HPFS, and NHS I and II. Information was collected by validated biennial questionnaires. The HR of incident stones in participants in different categories of physical activity and energy intake was assessed by Cox proportion hazards regression adjusted for age, body mass index, race, comorbidity, medication, calcium supplement use, fluid and nutrient intake.

RESULTS

Analysis included 215,133 participants. After up to 20 years of followup 5,355 incident cases of kidney stones occurred. On age adjusted analysis higher levels of physical activity were associated with a lower risk of incident kidney stones in women (NHS I and II) but not in men. However, after multivariate adjustment there was no significant association between physical activity and kidney stone risk in HPFS, and NHS I and II (highest vs lowest category HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.87-1.14, p for trend = 0.94, HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.85-1.19, p for trend = 0.88 and HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.90-1.18, p for trend = 0.64, respectively). Energy intake was not associated with stone risk (multivariate adjusted p for trend ≥0.49).

CONCLUSIONS

In 3 large prospective cohorts there was no independent association between physical activity and energy intake, and the incidence of symptomatic kidney stones.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medical Sciences, Columbus-Gemelli University Hospital, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: manuel.ferraro@channing.harvard.edu.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Division of Urology, Department of Veteran Affairs Medical Center and Department of Urology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington.Division of Nephrology, Department of Medical Sciences, Columbus-Gemelli University Hospital, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Division of Nephrology and Transplantation, Maine Medical Center, Portland, Maine.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25229560

Citation

Ferraro, Pietro Manuel, et al. "Physical Activity, Energy Intake and the Risk of Incident Kidney Stones." The Journal of Urology, vol. 193, no. 3, 2015, pp. 864-8.
Ferraro PM, Curhan GC, Sorensen MD, et al. Physical activity, energy intake and the risk of incident kidney stones. J Urol. 2015;193(3):864-8.
Ferraro, P. M., Curhan, G. C., Sorensen, M. D., Gambaro, G., & Taylor, E. N. (2015). Physical activity, energy intake and the risk of incident kidney stones. The Journal of Urology, 193(3), pp. 864-8. doi:10.1016/j.juro.2014.09.010.
Ferraro PM, et al. Physical Activity, Energy Intake and the Risk of Incident Kidney Stones. J Urol. 2015;193(3):864-8. PubMed PMID: 25229560.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physical activity, energy intake and the risk of incident kidney stones. AU - Ferraro,Pietro Manuel, AU - Curhan,Gary C, AU - Sorensen,Mathew D, AU - Gambaro,Giovanni, AU - Taylor,Eric N, Y1 - 2014/09/16/ PY - 2014/09/05/accepted PY - 2014/9/18/entrez PY - 2014/9/18/pubmed PY - 2015/10/1/medline KW - body mass index KW - energy intake KW - exercise KW - nephrolithiasis KW - risk SP - 864 EP - 8 JF - The Journal of urology JO - J. Urol. VL - 193 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: Recent data suggest that higher physical activity and lower energy intake may be associated with a lower risk of kidney stones. To our knowledge whether these associations could be reproduced in other study populations after accounting for life-style and dietary factors is not known. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed data on 3 large prospective cohorts, including HPFS, and NHS I and II. Information was collected by validated biennial questionnaires. The HR of incident stones in participants in different categories of physical activity and energy intake was assessed by Cox proportion hazards regression adjusted for age, body mass index, race, comorbidity, medication, calcium supplement use, fluid and nutrient intake. RESULTS: Analysis included 215,133 participants. After up to 20 years of followup 5,355 incident cases of kidney stones occurred. On age adjusted analysis higher levels of physical activity were associated with a lower risk of incident kidney stones in women (NHS I and II) but not in men. However, after multivariate adjustment there was no significant association between physical activity and kidney stone risk in HPFS, and NHS I and II (highest vs lowest category HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.87-1.14, p for trend = 0.94, HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.85-1.19, p for trend = 0.88 and HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.90-1.18, p for trend = 0.64, respectively). Energy intake was not associated with stone risk (multivariate adjusted p for trend ≥0.49). CONCLUSIONS: In 3 large prospective cohorts there was no independent association between physical activity and energy intake, and the incidence of symptomatic kidney stones. SN - 1527-3792 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25229560/Physical_activity_energy_intake_and_the_risk_of_incident_kidney_stones_ L2 - https://www.jurology.com/doi/full/10.1016/j.juro.2014.09.010?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -