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Cognitive consequences of overweight and obesity in the ninth decade of life?

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES

the association between late-life obesity and late-life cognitive abilities is poorly understood. We studied the association between body mass index (BMI) and cognitive change in longitudinal population-based study spanning over the ninth decade of life.

SUBJECTS/METHODS

in total, 475 participants free of dementia at baseline from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1921 (mean age: 79.1 years, SD: 0.6) were included. Height and weight were assessed at baseline. BMI was calculated as kg/m(2). Cognitive abilities were assessed at age ∼11 years and at age ∼79, ∼83, ∼87 and ∼90 years.

RESULTS

latent growth models showed that men being overweight and obese had a 0.65 (SD: 0.3) and 1.10 (SD: 0.5) points less steep decline in general cognitive ability (as measured by the Moray House Test) for each year than people of normal weight. These associations were to some extent confounded by childhood intelligence. No other association between BMI and cognition was significant, either for men or women. People who were obese in old age had significantly lower childhood intelligence (m = 43.6, SD: 1.3) than people who were normal in weight (m = 47.0, SD: 0.8) and persons being overweight (m = 47.5, SD: 0.8), F (472, 3) = 3.2, P = 0.043.

CONCLUSIONS

the current study shows weak or no evidence for an association between BMI in old age and cognitive function, especially not when childhood intelligence is controlled for. Lower intelligence at the age of 11 years predicted obesity at the age of 79 years.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm 17177, Sweden Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Box 1026, Jönköping 551 11, Sweden.

    ,

    Geriatric Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Royal Victoria Hospital, Craigleith Road, Edinburgh EH4 2DN, UK Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.

    ,

    Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.

    Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.

    Source

    Age and ageing 44:1 2015 Jan pg 59-65

    MeSH

    Age Factors
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Aging
    Body Mass Index
    Child
    Cognition
    Cognition Disorders
    Female
    Humans
    Intelligence
    Intelligence Tests
    Longitudinal Studies
    Male
    Obesity
    Overweight
    Risk Factors
    Scotland

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25249169

    Citation

    Aslan, Anna K Dahl, et al. "Cognitive Consequences of Overweight and Obesity in the Ninth Decade of Life?" Age and Ageing, vol. 44, no. 1, 2015, pp. 59-65.
    Aslan AK, Starr JM, Pattie A, et al. Cognitive consequences of overweight and obesity in the ninth decade of life? Age Ageing. 2015;44(1):59-65.
    Aslan, A. K., Starr, J. M., Pattie, A., & Deary, I. (2015). Cognitive consequences of overweight and obesity in the ninth decade of life? Age and Ageing, 44(1), pp. 59-65. doi:10.1093/ageing/afu108.
    Aslan AK, et al. Cognitive Consequences of Overweight and Obesity in the Ninth Decade of Life. Age Ageing. 2015;44(1):59-65. PubMed PMID: 25249169.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Cognitive consequences of overweight and obesity in the ninth decade of life? AU - Aslan,Anna K Dahl, AU - Starr,John M, AU - Pattie,Alison, AU - Deary,Ian, Y1 - 2014/09/23/ PY - 2014/9/25/entrez PY - 2014/9/25/pubmed PY - 2015/8/4/medline KW - aged KW - aged; 80 and over KW - body mass index KW - cognition KW - intelligence KW - longitudinal studies KW - older people SP - 59 EP - 65 JF - Age and ageing JO - Age Ageing VL - 44 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: the association between late-life obesity and late-life cognitive abilities is poorly understood. We studied the association between body mass index (BMI) and cognitive change in longitudinal population-based study spanning over the ninth decade of life. SUBJECTS/METHODS: in total, 475 participants free of dementia at baseline from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1921 (mean age: 79.1 years, SD: 0.6) were included. Height and weight were assessed at baseline. BMI was calculated as kg/m(2). Cognitive abilities were assessed at age ∼11 years and at age ∼79, ∼83, ∼87 and ∼90 years. RESULTS: latent growth models showed that men being overweight and obese had a 0.65 (SD: 0.3) and 1.10 (SD: 0.5) points less steep decline in general cognitive ability (as measured by the Moray House Test) for each year than people of normal weight. These associations were to some extent confounded by childhood intelligence. No other association between BMI and cognition was significant, either for men or women. People who were obese in old age had significantly lower childhood intelligence (m = 43.6, SD: 1.3) than people who were normal in weight (m = 47.0, SD: 0.8) and persons being overweight (m = 47.5, SD: 0.8), F (472, 3) = 3.2, P = 0.043. CONCLUSIONS: the current study shows weak or no evidence for an association between BMI in old age and cognitive function, especially not when childhood intelligence is controlled for. Lower intelligence at the age of 11 years predicted obesity at the age of 79 years. SN - 1468-2834 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25249169/Cognitive_consequences_of_overweight_and_obesity_in_the_ninth_decade_of_life L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ageing/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ageing/afu108 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -