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Travel-associated disease among US residents visiting US GeoSentinel clinics after return from international travel.
Fam Pract. 2014 Dec; 31(6):678-87.FP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

US residents make 60 million international trips annually. Family practice providers need to be aware of travel-associated diseases affecting this growing mobile population.

OBJECTIVE

To describe demographics, travel characteristics and clinical diagnoses of US residents who present ill after international travel.

METHODS

Descriptive analysis of travel-associated morbidity and mortality among US travellers seeking care at 1 of the 22 US practices and clinics participating in the GeoSentinel Global Surveillance Network from January 2000 to December 2012.

RESULTS

Of the 9624 ill US travellers included in the analysis, 3656 (38%) were tourist travellers, 2379 (25%) missionary/volunteer/research/aid workers (MVRA), 1580 (16%) travellers visiting friends and relatives (VFRs), 1394 (15%) business travellers and 593 (6%) student travellers. Median (interquartile range) travel duration was 20 days (10-60 days). Pre-travel advice was sought by 45%. Hospitalization was required by 7%. Compared with other groups of travellers, ill MVRA travellers returned from longer trips (median duration 61 days), while VFR travellers disproportionately required higher rates of inpatient care (24%) and less frequently had received pre-travel medical advice (20%). Illnesses of the gastrointestinal tract were the most common (58%), followed by systemic febrile illnesses (18%) and dermatologic disorders (17%). Three deaths were reported. Diagnoses varied according to the purpose of travel and region of exposure.

CONCLUSIONS

Returning ill US international travellers present with a broad spectrum of travel-associated diseases. Destination and reason for travel may help primary health care providers to generate an accurate differential diagnosis for the most common disorders and for those that may be life-threatening.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA, shagmann@bronxleb.org.Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.Department of Medicine and Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.Division of Infectious Diseases, Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center, Bronx, NY, USA, Present address: Division of Infectious Diseases, Hospital for Special Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA.Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA.Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.Division of Infectious Diseases, Jacobi Medical Center, Albert-Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.St. Luke's Roosevelt Hospital Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, Salt Lake City, UT, USA and.Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA, Present address: GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Brussels, Belgium.Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.Emory University Atlanta, GA, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25261506

Citation

Hagmann, Stefan H F., et al. "Travel-associated Disease Among US Residents Visiting US GeoSentinel Clinics After Return From International Travel." Family Practice, vol. 31, no. 6, 2014, pp. 678-87.
Hagmann SH, Han PV, Stauffer WM, et al. Travel-associated disease among US residents visiting US GeoSentinel clinics after return from international travel. Fam Pract. 2014;31(6):678-87.
Hagmann, S. H., Han, P. V., Stauffer, W. M., Miller, A. O., Connor, B. A., Hale, D. C., Coyle, C. M., Cahill, J. D., Marano, C., Esposito, D. H., & Kozarsky, P. E. (2014). Travel-associated disease among US residents visiting US GeoSentinel clinics after return from international travel. Family Practice, 31(6), 678-87. https://doi.org/10.1093/fampra/cmu063
Hagmann SH, et al. Travel-associated Disease Among US Residents Visiting US GeoSentinel Clinics After Return From International Travel. Fam Pract. 2014;31(6):678-87. PubMed PMID: 25261506.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Travel-associated disease among US residents visiting US GeoSentinel clinics after return from international travel. AU - Hagmann,Stefan H F, AU - Han,Pauline V, AU - Stauffer,William M, AU - Miller,Andy O, AU - Connor,Bradley A, AU - Hale,DeVon C, AU - Coyle,Christina M, AU - Cahill,John D, AU - Marano,Cinzia, AU - Esposito,Douglas H, AU - Kozarsky,Phyllis E, AU - ,, Y1 - 2014/09/26/ PY - 2014/9/28/entrez PY - 2014/9/28/pubmed PY - 2015/7/16/medline KW - Diagnosis KW - epidemiology KW - morbidity KW - prevention KW - surveillance KW - travel. SP - 678 EP - 87 JF - Family practice JO - Fam Pract VL - 31 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: US residents make 60 million international trips annually. Family practice providers need to be aware of travel-associated diseases affecting this growing mobile population. OBJECTIVE: To describe demographics, travel characteristics and clinical diagnoses of US residents who present ill after international travel. METHODS: Descriptive analysis of travel-associated morbidity and mortality among US travellers seeking care at 1 of the 22 US practices and clinics participating in the GeoSentinel Global Surveillance Network from January 2000 to December 2012. RESULTS: Of the 9624 ill US travellers included in the analysis, 3656 (38%) were tourist travellers, 2379 (25%) missionary/volunteer/research/aid workers (MVRA), 1580 (16%) travellers visiting friends and relatives (VFRs), 1394 (15%) business travellers and 593 (6%) student travellers. Median (interquartile range) travel duration was 20 days (10-60 days). Pre-travel advice was sought by 45%. Hospitalization was required by 7%. Compared with other groups of travellers, ill MVRA travellers returned from longer trips (median duration 61 days), while VFR travellers disproportionately required higher rates of inpatient care (24%) and less frequently had received pre-travel medical advice (20%). Illnesses of the gastrointestinal tract were the most common (58%), followed by systemic febrile illnesses (18%) and dermatologic disorders (17%). Three deaths were reported. Diagnoses varied according to the purpose of travel and region of exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Returning ill US international travellers present with a broad spectrum of travel-associated diseases. Destination and reason for travel may help primary health care providers to generate an accurate differential diagnosis for the most common disorders and for those that may be life-threatening. SN - 1460-2229 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25261506/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/fampra/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/fampra/cmu063 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -