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A behavioural neuroscience perspective on the aetiology and treatment of anxiety disorders.
Behav Res Ther. 2014 Nov; 62:24-36.BR

Abstract

Over the past decades, behaviour and cognitive psychology have produced fruitful and mutually converging theories from which hypotheses could be derived on the nature and origin of fear and anxiety disorders. Notwithstanding the emergence of effective treatments, there are still many questions that remain to be answered. Here, I will argue that the burgeoning field of behavioural neuroscience may advance our understanding of fear, anxiety disorders and its treatments. Decades of fear-conditioning research across species have begun to elucidate the neurobiological mechanisms underlying associative fear learning and memory. The fear-conditioning paradigm provides a well-controlled and fine-grained research platform to examine these processes. Although the traditional fear conditioning paradigm was originally designed to unveil general principles of fear (un)learning, it is well-suited to understand the transition from normal fear to pathological fear and the mechanisms of change. This paper presents 1) a selection of fear conditioning studies on the generalization and persistence of associative fear memory as intermediate phenotypes of fear and anxiety disorders, and 2) insights from neuroscience on the malleability of fear memory with the potential to provide a long-term cure for anxiety and related disorders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Research Priority Program Brain and Cognition, Amsterdam Brain and Cognition, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.kindt@uva.nl.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25261887

Citation

Kindt, Merel. "A Behavioural Neuroscience Perspective On the Aetiology and Treatment of Anxiety Disorders." Behaviour Research and Therapy, vol. 62, 2014, pp. 24-36.
Kindt M. A behavioural neuroscience perspective on the aetiology and treatment of anxiety disorders. Behav Res Ther. 2014;62:24-36.
Kindt, M. (2014). A behavioural neuroscience perspective on the aetiology and treatment of anxiety disorders. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 62, 24-36. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2014.08.012
Kindt M. A Behavioural Neuroscience Perspective On the Aetiology and Treatment of Anxiety Disorders. Behav Res Ther. 2014;62:24-36. PubMed PMID: 25261887.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A behavioural neuroscience perspective on the aetiology and treatment of anxiety disorders. A1 - Kindt,Merel, Y1 - 2014/09/10/ PY - 2014/06/18/received PY - 2014/08/18/revised PY - 2014/08/18/accepted PY - 2014/9/29/entrez PY - 2014/9/30/pubmed PY - 2015/10/16/medline KW - Anxiety and related disorders KW - Associative fear learning KW - Associative fear memory KW - Behavioural neuroscience KW - Disrupting reconsolidation KW - Fear conditioning KW - Fear extinction KW - Fear generalization KW - Fear persistence KW - Novel treatment SP - 24 EP - 36 JF - Behaviour research and therapy JO - Behav Res Ther VL - 62 N2 - Over the past decades, behaviour and cognitive psychology have produced fruitful and mutually converging theories from which hypotheses could be derived on the nature and origin of fear and anxiety disorders. Notwithstanding the emergence of effective treatments, there are still many questions that remain to be answered. Here, I will argue that the burgeoning field of behavioural neuroscience may advance our understanding of fear, anxiety disorders and its treatments. Decades of fear-conditioning research across species have begun to elucidate the neurobiological mechanisms underlying associative fear learning and memory. The fear-conditioning paradigm provides a well-controlled and fine-grained research platform to examine these processes. Although the traditional fear conditioning paradigm was originally designed to unveil general principles of fear (un)learning, it is well-suited to understand the transition from normal fear to pathological fear and the mechanisms of change. This paper presents 1) a selection of fear conditioning studies on the generalization and persistence of associative fear memory as intermediate phenotypes of fear and anxiety disorders, and 2) insights from neuroscience on the malleability of fear memory with the potential to provide a long-term cure for anxiety and related disorders. SN - 1873-622X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25261887/A_behavioural_neuroscience_perspective_on_the_aetiology_and_treatment_of_anxiety_disorders_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0005-7967(14)00141-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -