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Alcohol consumption and hip fracture risk.
Osteoporos Int 2015; 26(2):531-42OI

Abstract

SUMMARY

The present meta-analysis shows that a nonlinear association between alcohol consumption and the risk of hip fracture was observed. Light alcohol consumption was inversely significantly associated with hip fracture risk, whereas heavy alcohol consumption was associated with an elevated hip fracture risk.

INTRODUCTION

Previous studies examining the association between alcohol consumption and the risk of hip fracture have reported conflicting findings. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to assess the association between alcohol consumption and the risk of hip fracture.

METHODS

PubMed and EMBASE were searched for prospective cohort studies on the relationship between alcohol consumption and the risk of hip fractures. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were derived using random-effects models throughout the whole analysis.

RESULTS

Eighteen prospective cohort studies were included with 3,730,424 participants and 26,168 hip fracture cases. Compared with non-drinkers, the pooled RR of hip fractures for alcohol consumption was 1.03 (95% CI, 0.91-1.15), with high heterogeneity between studies (P<0.001, I2=72.6%). A nonlinear relationship between alcohol consumption and the risk of hip fracture was identified (P nonlinearity=0.003). Compared with non-drinkers, the pooled RRs of hip fractures were 0.88 (95% CI, 0.83-0.89) for light alcohol consumption (0.01-12.5 g/day), 1.00 (95% CI, 0.85-1.14) for moderate alcohol consumption (12.6-49.9 g/day), and 1.71 (95% CI, 1.41-2.01) for heavy alcohol consumption (≥50 g/day).

CONCLUSIONS

There was no evidence of publication bias. In conclusion, a nonlinear association between alcohol consumption and the risk of hip fracture was observed in this meta-analysis. Further, light alcohol consumption was inversely significantly associated with hip fracture risk, whereas heavy alcohol consumption was associated with an elevated hip fracture risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Medicine, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25266483

Citation

Zhang, X, et al. "Alcohol Consumption and Hip Fracture Risk." Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA, vol. 26, no. 2, 2015, pp. 531-42.
Zhang X, Yu Z, Yu M, et al. Alcohol consumption and hip fracture risk. Osteoporos Int. 2015;26(2):531-42.
Zhang, X., Yu, Z., Yu, M., & Qu, X. (2015). Alcohol consumption and hip fracture risk. Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA, 26(2), pp. 531-42. doi:10.1007/s00198-014-2879-y.
Zhang X, et al. Alcohol Consumption and Hip Fracture Risk. Osteoporos Int. 2015;26(2):531-42. PubMed PMID: 25266483.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol consumption and hip fracture risk. AU - Zhang,X, AU - Yu,Z, AU - Yu,M, AU - Qu,X, Y1 - 2014/09/30/ PY - 2014/04/19/received PY - 2014/08/27/accepted PY - 2014/10/1/entrez PY - 2014/10/1/pubmed PY - 2015/10/27/medline SP - 531 EP - 42 JF - Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA JO - Osteoporos Int VL - 26 IS - 2 N2 - SUMMARY: The present meta-analysis shows that a nonlinear association between alcohol consumption and the risk of hip fracture was observed. Light alcohol consumption was inversely significantly associated with hip fracture risk, whereas heavy alcohol consumption was associated with an elevated hip fracture risk. INTRODUCTION: Previous studies examining the association between alcohol consumption and the risk of hip fracture have reported conflicting findings. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to assess the association between alcohol consumption and the risk of hip fracture. METHODS: PubMed and EMBASE were searched for prospective cohort studies on the relationship between alcohol consumption and the risk of hip fractures. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were derived using random-effects models throughout the whole analysis. RESULTS: Eighteen prospective cohort studies were included with 3,730,424 participants and 26,168 hip fracture cases. Compared with non-drinkers, the pooled RR of hip fractures for alcohol consumption was 1.03 (95% CI, 0.91-1.15), with high heterogeneity between studies (P<0.001, I2=72.6%). A nonlinear relationship between alcohol consumption and the risk of hip fracture was identified (P nonlinearity=0.003). Compared with non-drinkers, the pooled RRs of hip fractures were 0.88 (95% CI, 0.83-0.89) for light alcohol consumption (0.01-12.5 g/day), 1.00 (95% CI, 0.85-1.14) for moderate alcohol consumption (12.6-49.9 g/day), and 1.71 (95% CI, 1.41-2.01) for heavy alcohol consumption (≥50 g/day). CONCLUSIONS: There was no evidence of publication bias. In conclusion, a nonlinear association between alcohol consumption and the risk of hip fracture was observed in this meta-analysis. Further, light alcohol consumption was inversely significantly associated with hip fracture risk, whereas heavy alcohol consumption was associated with an elevated hip fracture risk. SN - 1433-2965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25266483/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00198-014-2879-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -