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Pseudogymnoascus destructans: evidence of virulent skin invasion for bats under natural conditions, Europe.
Transbound Emerg Dis. 2015 Feb; 62(1):1-5.TE

Abstract

While Pseudogymnoascus destructans has been responsible for mass bat mortalities from white-nose syndrome (WNS) in North America, its virulence in Europe has been questioned. To shed the light on the issue of host-pathogen interaction between European bats and P. destructans, we examined seventeen bats emerging from the fungus-positive underground hibernacula in the Czech Republic during early spring 2013. Dual wing-membrane biopsies were taken from Barbastella barbastellus (1), Myotis daubentonii (1), Myotis emarginatus (1), Myotis myotis (11), Myotis nattereri (1) and Plecotus auritus (2) for standard histopathology and transmission electron microscopy. Non-lethal collection of suspected WNS lesions was guided by trans-illumination of the wing membranes with ultraviolet light. All bats selected for the present study were PCR-positive for P. destructans and showed microscopic findings consistent with the histopathological criteria for WNS diagnosis. Ultramicroscopy revealed oedema of the connective tissue and derangement of the fibroblasts and elastic fibres associated with skin invasion by P. destructans. Extensive fungal infection induced a marked inflammatory infiltration by neutrophils at the interface between the damaged part of the wing membrane replaced by the fungus and membrane tissue not yet invaded by the pathogen. There was no sign of keratinolytic activity in the stratum corneum. Here, we show that lesions pathognomonic for WNS are common in European bats and may also include overwhelming full-thickness fungal growth through the wing membrane equal in severity to reports from North America. Inter-continental differences in the outcome of WNS in bats in terms of morbidity/mortality may therefore not be due to differences in the pathogen itself.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ecology and Diseases of Game, Fish and Bees, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25268034

Citation

Bandouchova, H, et al. "Pseudogymnoascus Destructans: Evidence of Virulent Skin Invasion for Bats Under Natural Conditions, Europe." Transboundary and Emerging Diseases, vol. 62, no. 1, 2015, pp. 1-5.
Bandouchova H, Bartonicka T, Berkova H, et al. Pseudogymnoascus destructans: evidence of virulent skin invasion for bats under natural conditions, Europe. Transbound Emerg Dis. 2015;62(1):1-5.
Bandouchova, H., Bartonicka, T., Berkova, H., Brichta, J., Cerny, J., Kovacova, V., Kolarik, M., Köllner, B., Kulich, P., Martínková, N., Rehak, Z., Turner, G. G., Zukal, J., & Pikula, J. (2015). Pseudogymnoascus destructans: evidence of virulent skin invasion for bats under natural conditions, Europe. Transboundary and Emerging Diseases, 62(1), 1-5. https://doi.org/10.1111/tbed.12282
Bandouchova H, et al. Pseudogymnoascus Destructans: Evidence of Virulent Skin Invasion for Bats Under Natural Conditions, Europe. Transbound Emerg Dis. 2015;62(1):1-5. PubMed PMID: 25268034.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pseudogymnoascus destructans: evidence of virulent skin invasion for bats under natural conditions, Europe. AU - Bandouchova,H, AU - Bartonicka,T, AU - Berkova,H, AU - Brichta,J, AU - Cerny,J, AU - Kovacova,V, AU - Kolarik,M, AU - Köllner,B, AU - Kulich,P, AU - Martínková,N, AU - Rehak,Z, AU - Turner,G G, AU - Zukal,J, AU - Pikula,J, Y1 - 2014/09/30/ PY - 2014/03/30/received PY - 2014/10/1/entrez PY - 2014/10/1/pubmed PY - 2015/7/24/medline KW - chiroptera KW - morbidity KW - mortality KW - transmission electron microscopy KW - ultraviolet light diagnostics KW - white-nose syndrome SP - 1 EP - 5 JF - Transboundary and emerging diseases JO - Transbound Emerg Dis VL - 62 IS - 1 N2 - While Pseudogymnoascus destructans has been responsible for mass bat mortalities from white-nose syndrome (WNS) in North America, its virulence in Europe has been questioned. To shed the light on the issue of host-pathogen interaction between European bats and P. destructans, we examined seventeen bats emerging from the fungus-positive underground hibernacula in the Czech Republic during early spring 2013. Dual wing-membrane biopsies were taken from Barbastella barbastellus (1), Myotis daubentonii (1), Myotis emarginatus (1), Myotis myotis (11), Myotis nattereri (1) and Plecotus auritus (2) for standard histopathology and transmission electron microscopy. Non-lethal collection of suspected WNS lesions was guided by trans-illumination of the wing membranes with ultraviolet light. All bats selected for the present study were PCR-positive for P. destructans and showed microscopic findings consistent with the histopathological criteria for WNS diagnosis. Ultramicroscopy revealed oedema of the connective tissue and derangement of the fibroblasts and elastic fibres associated with skin invasion by P. destructans. Extensive fungal infection induced a marked inflammatory infiltration by neutrophils at the interface between the damaged part of the wing membrane replaced by the fungus and membrane tissue not yet invaded by the pathogen. There was no sign of keratinolytic activity in the stratum corneum. Here, we show that lesions pathognomonic for WNS are common in European bats and may also include overwhelming full-thickness fungal growth through the wing membrane equal in severity to reports from North America. Inter-continental differences in the outcome of WNS in bats in terms of morbidity/mortality may therefore not be due to differences in the pathogen itself. SN - 1865-1682 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25268034/Pseudogymnoascus_destructans:_evidence_of_virulent_skin_invasion_for_bats_under_natural_conditions_Europe_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/tbed.12282 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -