Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Biopterin status in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease is associated with disease severity and cardiovascular risk factors.
J Vet Intern Med. 2014 Sep-Oct; 28(5):1520-6.JV

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Endothelial dysfunction (ED) has been suggested to be associated with myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) in dogs. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an important cofactor for production of the endothelium-derived vasodilator nitric oxide (NO). Under conditions of oxidative stress, BH4 is oxidized to the biologically inactive form dihydrobiopterin (BH2). Thus, plasma concentrations of BH2 and BH4 may reflect ED and oxidative stress.

OBJECTIVE

To determine plasma concentrations of BH2 and BH4 in dogs with different degrees of MMVD.

ANIMALS

Eighty-four privately owned dogs grouped according to ACVIM guidelines (37 healthy control dogs including 13 Beagles and 24 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels [CKCSs], 33 CKCSs with MMVD of differing severity including 18 CKCSs [group B1] and 15 CKCSs [group B2], and 14 dogs of different breeds with clinical signs of congestive heart failure [CHF] because of MMVD [group C]).

METHODS

Dogs underwent clinical examination including echocardiography. Plasma concentrations of BH2 and BH4 were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

RESULTS

Higher plasma BH4 and BH2 concentrations were found with dogs in CHF compared with all other groups (control, B1 and B2; P ≤ .001). Females had higher concentrations of BH4 and BH4/BH2 (P ≤ .0003). BH4/BH2 was found to decrease with age (P < .0001). Cardiovascular risk factors in humans such as passive smoking (P ≤ .01) and increased body weight (P ≤ .009) were associated with lower BH4 concentrations.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE

Age, sex, body weight, passive smoking, and cardiac status are associated with plasma biopterin concentration in dogs. Additional studies should clarify the clinical implications of the findings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25274442

Citation

Reimann, M J., et al. "Biopterin Status in Dogs With Myxomatous Mitral Valve Disease Is Associated With Disease Severity and Cardiovascular Risk Factors." Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, vol. 28, no. 5, 2014, pp. 1520-6.
Reimann MJ, Häggström J, Mortensen A, et al. Biopterin status in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease is associated with disease severity and cardiovascular risk factors. J Vet Intern Med. 2014;28(5):1520-6.
Reimann, M. J., Häggström, J., Mortensen, A., Lykkesfeldt, J., Møller, J. E., Falk, T., & Olsen, L. H. (2014). Biopterin status in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease is associated with disease severity and cardiovascular risk factors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 28(5), 1520-6. https://doi.org/10.1111/jvim.12425
Reimann MJ, et al. Biopterin Status in Dogs With Myxomatous Mitral Valve Disease Is Associated With Disease Severity and Cardiovascular Risk Factors. J Vet Intern Med. 2014 Sep-Oct;28(5):1520-6. PubMed PMID: 25274442.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Biopterin status in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease is associated with disease severity and cardiovascular risk factors. AU - Reimann,M J, AU - Häggström,J, AU - Mortensen,A, AU - Lykkesfeldt,J, AU - Møller,J E, AU - Falk,T, AU - Olsen,L H, PY - 2013/12/19/received PY - 2014/06/02/revised PY - 2014/06/30/accepted PY - 2014/10/3/entrez PY - 2014/10/3/pubmed PY - 2015/6/27/medline KW - Endothelial dysfunction KW - Mitral regurgitation KW - Oxidative stress KW - Tetrahydrobiopterin SP - 1520 EP - 6 JF - Journal of veterinary internal medicine JO - J. Vet. Intern. Med. VL - 28 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Endothelial dysfunction (ED) has been suggested to be associated with myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) in dogs. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an important cofactor for production of the endothelium-derived vasodilator nitric oxide (NO). Under conditions of oxidative stress, BH4 is oxidized to the biologically inactive form dihydrobiopterin (BH2). Thus, plasma concentrations of BH2 and BH4 may reflect ED and oxidative stress. OBJECTIVE: To determine plasma concentrations of BH2 and BH4 in dogs with different degrees of MMVD. ANIMALS: Eighty-four privately owned dogs grouped according to ACVIM guidelines (37 healthy control dogs including 13 Beagles and 24 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels [CKCSs], 33 CKCSs with MMVD of differing severity including 18 CKCSs [group B1] and 15 CKCSs [group B2], and 14 dogs of different breeds with clinical signs of congestive heart failure [CHF] because of MMVD [group C]). METHODS: Dogs underwent clinical examination including echocardiography. Plasma concentrations of BH2 and BH4 were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. RESULTS: Higher plasma BH4 and BH2 concentrations were found with dogs in CHF compared with all other groups (control, B1 and B2; P ≤ .001). Females had higher concentrations of BH4 and BH4/BH2 (P ≤ .0003). BH4/BH2 was found to decrease with age (P < .0001). Cardiovascular risk factors in humans such as passive smoking (P ≤ .01) and increased body weight (P ≤ .009) were associated with lower BH4 concentrations. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Age, sex, body weight, passive smoking, and cardiac status are associated with plasma biopterin concentration in dogs. Additional studies should clarify the clinical implications of the findings. SN - 1939-1676 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25274442/Biopterin_status_in_dogs_with_myxomatous_mitral_valve_disease_is_associated_with_disease_severity_and_cardiovascular_risk_factors_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jvim.12425 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -