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Intestinal current measurement versus nasal potential difference measurements for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: a case-control study.
BMC Pulm Med. 2014 Oct 04; 14:156.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Nasal potential difference (NPD) and intestinal current measurement (ICM) are functional CFTR tests that are used as adjunctive diagnostic tools for cystic fibrosis (CF). Smoking has a systemic negative impact on CFTR function. A diagnostic comparison between NPD and ICM and the impact of smoking on both CFTR tests has not been done.

METHODS

The sweat chloride test, NPD, and ICM were performed in 18 patients with CF (sweat chloride >60 mmol/l), including 6 pancreatic sufficient (PS) patients, and 13 healthy controls, including 8 smokers. The NPD CFTR response to Cl-free and isoproterenol perfusion (Δ0Cl- + Iso) was compared to the ICM CFTR response to forskolin/IBMX, carbachol, and histamine (ΔIsc, forskolin/IBMX+ carbachol+histamine).

RESULTS

The mean NPD CFTR response and ICM CFTR response between patients with CF and healthy controls was significantly different (p <0.001), but not between patients with CF who were PS and those who were pancreatic insufficient (PI). Smokers have a decreased CFTR response measured by NPD (p = 0.049). For ICM there is a trend towards decreased CFTR response (NS). Three healthy control smokers had NPD responses within the CF-range. In contrast to NPD, there was no overlap of the ICM response between patients with CF and controls.

CONCLUSIONS

ICM is superior to NPD in distinguishing between patients with CF who have a sweat chloride > 60 mmol/l and healthy controls, including smokers. Neither NPD nor ICM differentiated between patients with CF who were PS from those who were PI. Smoking has a negative impact on CFTR function in healthy controls measured by NPD and challenges the diagnostic interpretation of NPD, but not ICM.

Authors+Show Affiliations

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableDepartment of Pediatrics, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Feulgenstrasse 12, 35385 Giessen, Germany. lutz.naehrlich@paediat.med.uni-giessen.de.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25280757

Citation

Bagheri-Hanson, Azadeh, et al. "Intestinal Current Measurement Versus Nasal Potential Difference Measurements for Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis: a Case-control Study." BMC Pulmonary Medicine, vol. 14, 2014, p. 156.
Bagheri-Hanson A, Nedwed S, Rueckes-Nilges C, et al. Intestinal current measurement versus nasal potential difference measurements for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: a case-control study. BMC Pulm Med. 2014;14:156.
Bagheri-Hanson, A., Nedwed, S., Rueckes-Nilges, C., & Naehrlich, L. (2014). Intestinal current measurement versus nasal potential difference measurements for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: a case-control study. BMC Pulmonary Medicine, 14, 156. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2466-14-156
Bagheri-Hanson A, et al. Intestinal Current Measurement Versus Nasal Potential Difference Measurements for Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis: a Case-control Study. BMC Pulm Med. 2014 Oct 4;14:156. PubMed PMID: 25280757.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intestinal current measurement versus nasal potential difference measurements for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: a case-control study. AU - Bagheri-Hanson,Azadeh, AU - Nedwed,Sebastian, AU - Rueckes-Nilges,Claudia, AU - Naehrlich,Lutz, Y1 - 2014/10/04/ PY - 2014/06/18/received PY - 2014/09/29/accepted PY - 2014/10/5/entrez PY - 2014/10/5/pubmed PY - 2015/5/27/medline SP - 156 EP - 156 JF - BMC pulmonary medicine JO - BMC Pulm Med VL - 14 N2 - BACKGROUND: Nasal potential difference (NPD) and intestinal current measurement (ICM) are functional CFTR tests that are used as adjunctive diagnostic tools for cystic fibrosis (CF). Smoking has a systemic negative impact on CFTR function. A diagnostic comparison between NPD and ICM and the impact of smoking on both CFTR tests has not been done. METHODS: The sweat chloride test, NPD, and ICM were performed in 18 patients with CF (sweat chloride >60 mmol/l), including 6 pancreatic sufficient (PS) patients, and 13 healthy controls, including 8 smokers. The NPD CFTR response to Cl-free and isoproterenol perfusion (Δ0Cl- + Iso) was compared to the ICM CFTR response to forskolin/IBMX, carbachol, and histamine (ΔIsc, forskolin/IBMX+ carbachol+histamine). RESULTS: The mean NPD CFTR response and ICM CFTR response between patients with CF and healthy controls was significantly different (p <0.001), but not between patients with CF who were PS and those who were pancreatic insufficient (PI). Smokers have a decreased CFTR response measured by NPD (p = 0.049). For ICM there is a trend towards decreased CFTR response (NS). Three healthy control smokers had NPD responses within the CF-range. In contrast to NPD, there was no overlap of the ICM response between patients with CF and controls. CONCLUSIONS: ICM is superior to NPD in distinguishing between patients with CF who have a sweat chloride > 60 mmol/l and healthy controls, including smokers. Neither NPD nor ICM differentiated between patients with CF who were PS from those who were PI. Smoking has a negative impact on CFTR function in healthy controls measured by NPD and challenges the diagnostic interpretation of NPD, but not ICM. SN - 1471-2466 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25280757/Intestinal_current_measurement_versus_nasal_potential_difference_measurements_for_diagnosis_of_cystic_fibrosis:_a_case_control_study_ L2 - https://bmcpulmmed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2466-14-156 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -