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Comparison of the acceptability and benefits of two mindfulness-based interventions in women with breast or gynecologic cancer: a pilot study.
Support Care Cancer 2015; 23(4):1063-71SC

Abstract

PURPOSE

The aim of this study was to compare the relative benefits and acceptability of two different group-based mindfulness psychotherapy interventions among women with breast and gynecologic cancer.

METHODS

Data from 42 women who completed an 8-week mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) program comprising 22 contact hours were compared to data from 24 women who completed a 6-week mindfulness meditation program (MMP) comprising 9 contact hours. Distress, quality of life (QOL), and mindfulness were evaluated pre- (T1) and post-intervention (T2). ANCOVA was used to analyse the relationship between intervention type and T1 score on outcome variable change scores. Participants' perceptions of benefit and acceptability were assessed.

RESULTS

The participants did not differ on clinical or demographic variables other than MBCT participants were more likely than MMP participants to have a past history of anxiety or depression (p = .01). Scores on distress, QOL, and mindfulness improved from T1 to T2 with medium to large effect sizes for the MMP (p=.002, d=.7; p=.001, d=.8; p=.005, d=.6, respectively) and MBCT (p<.001,d = .6; p=.008, d = .4; p<.001, d=.9, respectively) interventions. [correted]. ANCOVA showed no main effect for intervention type on outcome change scores and no interaction between intervention type and respective T1 score. Distress and mindfulness scores at T1 had a main effect on respective change scores (p = .02, ηp (2) = .87; p = .01, ηp (2) = .80, respectively). Both programs were perceived as beneficial and acceptable with no differences between the intervention types.

CONCLUSIONS

Within the limits of a small, non-randomized study, these findings provide preliminary support for the utility of a brief mindfulness intervention for improving distress and QOL in a heterogeneous group of women with cancer. Abbreviated interventions are less resource intensive and may be attractive to very unwell patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Women's Mental Health, Royal Women's Hospital, Locked Bag 300, Parkville, 3052, Victoria, Australia, Lesley.stafford@thewomens.org.au.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25281227

Citation

Stafford, Lesley, et al. "Comparison of the Acceptability and Benefits of Two Mindfulness-based Interventions in Women With Breast or Gynecologic Cancer: a Pilot Study." Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, vol. 23, no. 4, 2015, pp. 1063-71.
Stafford L, Thomas N, Foley E, et al. Comparison of the acceptability and benefits of two mindfulness-based interventions in women with breast or gynecologic cancer: a pilot study. Support Care Cancer. 2015;23(4):1063-71.
Stafford, L., Thomas, N., Foley, E., Judd, F., Gibson, P., Komiti, A., ... Kiropoulos, L. (2015). Comparison of the acceptability and benefits of two mindfulness-based interventions in women with breast or gynecologic cancer: a pilot study. Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, 23(4), pp. 1063-71. doi:10.1007/s00520-014-2442-6.
Stafford L, et al. Comparison of the Acceptability and Benefits of Two Mindfulness-based Interventions in Women With Breast or Gynecologic Cancer: a Pilot Study. Support Care Cancer. 2015;23(4):1063-71. PubMed PMID: 25281227.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of the acceptability and benefits of two mindfulness-based interventions in women with breast or gynecologic cancer: a pilot study. AU - Stafford,Lesley, AU - Thomas,Naomi, AU - Foley,Elizabeth, AU - Judd,Fiona, AU - Gibson,Penny, AU - Komiti,Angela, AU - Couper,Jeremy, AU - Kiropoulos,Litza, Y1 - 2014/10/04/ PY - 2014/05/04/received PY - 2014/09/09/accepted PY - 2014/10/5/entrez PY - 2014/10/5/pubmed PY - 2015/6/9/medline SP - 1063 EP - 71 JF - Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer JO - Support Care Cancer VL - 23 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to compare the relative benefits and acceptability of two different group-based mindfulness psychotherapy interventions among women with breast and gynecologic cancer. METHODS: Data from 42 women who completed an 8-week mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) program comprising 22 contact hours were compared to data from 24 women who completed a 6-week mindfulness meditation program (MMP) comprising 9 contact hours. Distress, quality of life (QOL), and mindfulness were evaluated pre- (T1) and post-intervention (T2). ANCOVA was used to analyse the relationship between intervention type and T1 score on outcome variable change scores. Participants' perceptions of benefit and acceptability were assessed. RESULTS: The participants did not differ on clinical or demographic variables other than MBCT participants were more likely than MMP participants to have a past history of anxiety or depression (p = .01). Scores on distress, QOL, and mindfulness improved from T1 to T2 with medium to large effect sizes for the MMP (p=.002, d=.7; p=.001, d=.8; p=.005, d=.6, respectively) and MBCT (p<.001,d = .6; p=.008, d = .4; p<.001, d=.9, respectively) interventions. [correted]. ANCOVA showed no main effect for intervention type on outcome change scores and no interaction between intervention type and respective T1 score. Distress and mindfulness scores at T1 had a main effect on respective change scores (p = .02, ηp (2) = .87; p = .01, ηp (2) = .80, respectively). Both programs were perceived as beneficial and acceptable with no differences between the intervention types. CONCLUSIONS: Within the limits of a small, non-randomized study, these findings provide preliminary support for the utility of a brief mindfulness intervention for improving distress and QOL in a heterogeneous group of women with cancer. Abbreviated interventions are less resource intensive and may be attractive to very unwell patients. SN - 1433-7339 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25281227/Comparison_of_the_acceptability_and_benefits_of_two_mindfulness_based_interventions_in_women_with_breast_or_gynecologic_cancer:_a_pilot_study_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-014-2442-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -