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Alcohol consumption in relation to plasma sex hormones, prolactin, and sex hormone-binding globulin in premenopausal women.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2014 Dec; 23(12):2943-53.CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Alcohol consumption is a consistent risk factor for breast cancer, and evidence suggests premenopausal plasma hormones are associated with breast cancer.

METHODS

Plasma concentrations of estradiol, estrone, estrone sulfate, testosterone, androstenedione, progesterone, prolactin, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were measured in samples collected in 1996-99. Average alcohol intake was calculated from semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires collected in 1995 and 1999. We used generalized linear models to calculate geometric mean hormone concentrations across alcohol categories and the percentage difference for the highest versus lowest category.

RESULTS

Comparing women who consumed >20 g/d with nondrinkers, levels were 25.7% higher for luteal estrone (geometric mean, 106 vs. 84.5 pg/mL; Ptrend = 0.001), 27.2% higher for luteal estradiol (182 vs. 143 pg/mL; Ptrend = 0.006), and 16.8% higher for SHBG (85.6 vs. 73.3 nmol/L; Ptrend = 0.03); concentrations of free testosterone were 17.9% lower (0.16 vs. 0.20 ng/dL; Ptrend = 0.002). Women consuming >10 g/d compared with nondrinkers had 26.5% higher concentrations of follicular estrone sulfate (950 vs. 751 pg/mL; Ptrend = 0.04). We did not observe significant associations between alcohol and the other sex hormones evaluated. Significant positive associations were observed with beer intake, but not other alcohol types, for DHEA (Pinteraction = 0.003) and androstenedione (Pinteraction = 0.006).

CONCLUSION

Alcohol consumption was significantly positively associated with plasma luteal estrogen concentrations, but not with androgen levels, nor estrone or estradiol measured in the follicular phase.

IMPACT

Differences in premenopausal estrogen levels may contribute to the association between alcohol and breast cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. kelly.hirko@channing.harvard.edu.Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25281368

Citation

Hirko, Kelly A., et al. "Alcohol Consumption in Relation to Plasma Sex Hormones, Prolactin, and Sex Hormone-binding Globulin in Premenopausal Women." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 23, no. 12, 2014, pp. 2943-53.
Hirko KA, Spiegelman D, Willett WC, et al. Alcohol consumption in relation to plasma sex hormones, prolactin, and sex hormone-binding globulin in premenopausal women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2014;23(12):2943-53.
Hirko, K. A., Spiegelman, D., Willett, W. C., Hankinson, S. E., & Eliassen, A. H. (2014). Alcohol consumption in relation to plasma sex hormones, prolactin, and sex hormone-binding globulin in premenopausal women. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 23(12), 2943-53. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0982
Hirko KA, et al. Alcohol Consumption in Relation to Plasma Sex Hormones, Prolactin, and Sex Hormone-binding Globulin in Premenopausal Women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2014;23(12):2943-53. PubMed PMID: 25281368.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol consumption in relation to plasma sex hormones, prolactin, and sex hormone-binding globulin in premenopausal women. AU - Hirko,Kelly A, AU - Spiegelman,Donna, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Hankinson,Susan E, AU - Eliassen,A Heather, Y1 - 2014/10/03/ PY - 2014/10/5/entrez PY - 2014/10/5/pubmed PY - 2015/8/12/medline SP - 2943 EP - 53 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev VL - 23 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Alcohol consumption is a consistent risk factor for breast cancer, and evidence suggests premenopausal plasma hormones are associated with breast cancer. METHODS: Plasma concentrations of estradiol, estrone, estrone sulfate, testosterone, androstenedione, progesterone, prolactin, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were measured in samples collected in 1996-99. Average alcohol intake was calculated from semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires collected in 1995 and 1999. We used generalized linear models to calculate geometric mean hormone concentrations across alcohol categories and the percentage difference for the highest versus lowest category. RESULTS: Comparing women who consumed >20 g/d with nondrinkers, levels were 25.7% higher for luteal estrone (geometric mean, 106 vs. 84.5 pg/mL; Ptrend = 0.001), 27.2% higher for luteal estradiol (182 vs. 143 pg/mL; Ptrend = 0.006), and 16.8% higher for SHBG (85.6 vs. 73.3 nmol/L; Ptrend = 0.03); concentrations of free testosterone were 17.9% lower (0.16 vs. 0.20 ng/dL; Ptrend = 0.002). Women consuming >10 g/d compared with nondrinkers had 26.5% higher concentrations of follicular estrone sulfate (950 vs. 751 pg/mL; Ptrend = 0.04). We did not observe significant associations between alcohol and the other sex hormones evaluated. Significant positive associations were observed with beer intake, but not other alcohol types, for DHEA (Pinteraction = 0.003) and androstenedione (Pinteraction = 0.006). CONCLUSION: Alcohol consumption was significantly positively associated with plasma luteal estrogen concentrations, but not with androgen levels, nor estrone or estradiol measured in the follicular phase. IMPACT: Differences in premenopausal estrogen levels may contribute to the association between alcohol and breast cancer. SN - 1538-7755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25281368/Alcohol_consumption_in_relation_to_plasma_sex_hormones_prolactin_and_sex_hormone_binding_globulin_in_premenopausal_women_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=25281368 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -