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Early intervention program reduces stress in parents of preterms during childhood, a randomized controlled trial.
Trials. 2014 Oct 04; 15:387.T

Abstract

BACKGROUND

It is well documented that heightened levels of parenting stress have a negative influence on children's socio-emotional and behavioral development. Parenting stress may therefore be regarded as an outcome variable in its own right. This study investigated whether a sensitizing intervention influences stress reported by parents of prematurely born children until the children were age nine.

METHODS

Preterm infants (N = 146, birth weight <2,000 g) were randomized to intervention (N = 72) with the Mother-Infant Transaction Program (MITP) or a preterm control group (N = 74) that received standard hospital care. A term reference group comprised 75 healthy, full-term neonates. Parents reported on the Parenting Stress Index (PSI) when the children were 6 months, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 years old and on the PSI-Short Form (PSI-SF) at age 9. Main outcomes were the mother's and father's reports of total, child and parent-related stress. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were performed using linear mixed models (LMM), taking dependency in the data caused by twin pairs and repeated measures into account. Response rates were high across all follow-ups, and still reached 85% from mothers and 72% from fathers at 9 years.

RESULTS

Mothers in the intervention group reported better longitudinal development of child-related stress than mothers of preterm controls, as they perceived their children as being more adaptable and less moody throughout childhood until the age of seven. Less stress in the intervention group was revealed by cross-sectional analysis of maternal reports at all ages, while fathers reported similar differences at ages three and five. Parents in the intervention group reported stronger agreement on several stress scores on several occasions. Fathers with high interventional participation (mean 54%) reported significantly less stress at age nine than those who participated less. Both parents in the intervention group reported levels of stress similar to those experienced by the term reference group at all follow-ups, while differences between the preterm control and term reference groups increased.

CONCLUSIONS

This early intervention reduces stress among parents of prematurely born children to a level reported by parents of term-born children and enhances agreement between parents.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

Clinical Trials Gov identifier NCT00222456, 05.09.2005.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Child and Adolescent Department, University Hospital of Northern Norway, Tromsø, Norway. inger.pauline.landsem@unn.no.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25282345

Citation

Landsem, Inger Pauline, et al. "Early Intervention Program Reduces Stress in Parents of Preterms During Childhood, a Randomized Controlled Trial." Trials, vol. 15, 2014, p. 387.
Landsem IP, Handegård BH, Tunby J, et al. Early intervention program reduces stress in parents of preterms during childhood, a randomized controlled trial. Trials. 2014;15:387.
Landsem, I. P., Handegård, B. H., Tunby, J., Ulvund, S. E., & Rønning, J. A. (2014). Early intervention program reduces stress in parents of preterms during childhood, a randomized controlled trial. Trials, 15, 387. https://doi.org/10.1186/1745-6215-15-387
Landsem IP, et al. Early Intervention Program Reduces Stress in Parents of Preterms During Childhood, a Randomized Controlled Trial. Trials. 2014 Oct 4;15:387. PubMed PMID: 25282345.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early intervention program reduces stress in parents of preterms during childhood, a randomized controlled trial. AU - Landsem,Inger Pauline, AU - Handegård,Bjørn Helge, AU - Tunby,Jorunn, AU - Ulvund,Stein Erik, AU - Rønning,John A, Y1 - 2014/10/04/ PY - 2014/01/21/received PY - 2014/09/09/accepted PY - 2014/10/6/entrez PY - 2014/10/6/pubmed PY - 2015/5/29/medline SP - 387 EP - 387 JF - Trials JO - Trials VL - 15 N2 - BACKGROUND: It is well documented that heightened levels of parenting stress have a negative influence on children's socio-emotional and behavioral development. Parenting stress may therefore be regarded as an outcome variable in its own right. This study investigated whether a sensitizing intervention influences stress reported by parents of prematurely born children until the children were age nine. METHODS: Preterm infants (N = 146, birth weight <2,000 g) were randomized to intervention (N = 72) with the Mother-Infant Transaction Program (MITP) or a preterm control group (N = 74) that received standard hospital care. A term reference group comprised 75 healthy, full-term neonates. Parents reported on the Parenting Stress Index (PSI) when the children were 6 months, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 years old and on the PSI-Short Form (PSI-SF) at age 9. Main outcomes were the mother's and father's reports of total, child and parent-related stress. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were performed using linear mixed models (LMM), taking dependency in the data caused by twin pairs and repeated measures into account. Response rates were high across all follow-ups, and still reached 85% from mothers and 72% from fathers at 9 years. RESULTS: Mothers in the intervention group reported better longitudinal development of child-related stress than mothers of preterm controls, as they perceived their children as being more adaptable and less moody throughout childhood until the age of seven. Less stress in the intervention group was revealed by cross-sectional analysis of maternal reports at all ages, while fathers reported similar differences at ages three and five. Parents in the intervention group reported stronger agreement on several stress scores on several occasions. Fathers with high interventional participation (mean 54%) reported significantly less stress at age nine than those who participated less. Both parents in the intervention group reported levels of stress similar to those experienced by the term reference group at all follow-ups, while differences between the preterm control and term reference groups increased. CONCLUSIONS: This early intervention reduces stress among parents of prematurely born children to a level reported by parents of term-born children and enhances agreement between parents. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinical Trials Gov identifier NCT00222456, 05.09.2005. SN - 1745-6215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25282345/Early_intervention_program_reduces_stress_in_parents_of_preterms_during_childhood_a_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://trialsjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1745-6215-15-387 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -