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Meat morals: relationship between meat consumption consumer attitudes towards human and animal welfare and moral behavior.

Abstract

The aim of this work is to explore the relation between morality and diet choice by investigating how animal and human welfare attitudes and donation behaviors can predict a meat eating versus flexitarian versus vegetarian diet. The results of a survey study (N=299) show that animal health concerns (measured by the Animal Attitude Scale) can predict diet choice. Vegetarians are most concerned, while full-time meat eaters are least concerned, and the contrast between flexitarians and vegetarians is greater than the contrast between flexitarians and full-time meat eaters. With regards to human welfare (measured by the Moral Foundations Questionnaire), results show that attitudes towards human suffering set flexitarians apart from vegetarians and attitudes towards authority and respect distinguish between flexitarians and meat eaters. To conclude, results show that vegetarians donate more often to animal oriented charities than flexitarians and meat eaters, while no differences between the three diet groups occur for donations to human oriented charities.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Communication Studies, University of Antwerp, Sint-Jacobstraat 2, 2000 Antwerp, Belgium.

    Department of Communication Studies, Ghent University, Korte Meer 7-11, 9000 Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: Liselot.Hudders@Ugent.be.

    Source

    Meat science 99: 2015 Jan pg 68-74

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Animal Welfare
    Attitude
    Charities
    Choice Behavior
    Diet
    Diet, Vegetarian
    Feeding Behavior
    Female
    Food Preferences
    Humans
    Male
    Meat
    Middle Aged
    Morals
    Social Behavior
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25282670

    Citation

    De Backer, Charlotte J S., and Liselot Hudders. "Meat Morals: Relationship Between Meat Consumption Consumer Attitudes Towards Human and Animal Welfare and Moral Behavior." Meat Science, vol. 99, 2015, pp. 68-74.
    De Backer CJ, Hudders L. Meat morals: relationship between meat consumption consumer attitudes towards human and animal welfare and moral behavior. Meat Sci. 2015;99:68-74.
    De Backer, C. J., & Hudders, L. (2015). Meat morals: relationship between meat consumption consumer attitudes towards human and animal welfare and moral behavior. Meat Science, 99, pp. 68-74. doi:10.1016/j.meatsci.2014.08.011.
    De Backer CJ, Hudders L. Meat Morals: Relationship Between Meat Consumption Consumer Attitudes Towards Human and Animal Welfare and Moral Behavior. Meat Sci. 2015;99:68-74. PubMed PMID: 25282670.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Meat morals: relationship between meat consumption consumer attitudes towards human and animal welfare and moral behavior. AU - De Backer,Charlotte J S, AU - Hudders,Liselot, Y1 - 2014/08/28/ PY - 2014/01/14/received PY - 2014/07/07/revised PY - 2014/08/20/accepted PY - 2014/10/6/entrez PY - 2014/10/6/pubmed PY - 2015/7/25/medline KW - Animal concern KW - Human welfare KW - Meat consumption KW - Morality KW - Vegetarianism SP - 68 EP - 74 JF - Meat science JO - Meat Sci. VL - 99 N2 - The aim of this work is to explore the relation between morality and diet choice by investigating how animal and human welfare attitudes and donation behaviors can predict a meat eating versus flexitarian versus vegetarian diet. The results of a survey study (N=299) show that animal health concerns (measured by the Animal Attitude Scale) can predict diet choice. Vegetarians are most concerned, while full-time meat eaters are least concerned, and the contrast between flexitarians and vegetarians is greater than the contrast between flexitarians and full-time meat eaters. With regards to human welfare (measured by the Moral Foundations Questionnaire), results show that attitudes towards human suffering set flexitarians apart from vegetarians and attitudes towards authority and respect distinguish between flexitarians and meat eaters. To conclude, results show that vegetarians donate more often to animal oriented charities than flexitarians and meat eaters, while no differences between the three diet groups occur for donations to human oriented charities. SN - 1873-4138 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25282670/Meat_morals:_relationship_between_meat_consumption_consumer_attitudes_towards_human_and_animal_welfare_and_moral_behavior_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0309-1740(14)00276-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -