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Inverse associations of outdoor activity and vitamin D intake with the risk of Parkinson's disease.
J Zhejiang Univ Sci B 2014; 15(10):923-7JZ

Abstract

Early studies had suggested that vitamin D intake was inversely associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis. However, the associations of vitamin D intake and outdoor activities with Parkinson's disease (PD) are still unclear, so this study is to evaluate these relationships from a case-control study in elderly Chinese. The study population involved 209 cases with new onsets of PD and 210 controls without neurodegenerative diseases. The data on dietary vitamin D and outdoor activities were collected using a food-frequency questionnaire and self-report questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to examine the associations between dietary outdoor activities, vitamin D intake and PD. Adjustment was made for sex, age, smoking, alcohol use, education, and body mass index (BMI). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for PD in quartiles for outdoor physical activity were 1 (reference), 0.739 (0.413, 1.321), 0.501 (0.282, 0.891), and 0.437 (0.241, 0.795), respectively (P=0.002 for trend). Adjusted ORs for PD in quartiles for total vitamin D intake were 1 (reference), 0.647 (0.357, 1.170), 0.571 (0.318, 1.022), and 0.538 (0.301, 0.960), respectively (P=0.011 for trend). Our study suggested that outdoor activity and total vitamin D intake were inversely associated with PD, and outdoor activity seems to be more significantly associated with decreased risk for PD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086, China; Genome Analysis Laboratory, Tianjin Institute of Industrial Biotechnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianjin 300308, China; Department of Rehabilitation, the First Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001, China; Department of Neurology, the First Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25294382

Citation

Zhu, Dan, et al. "Inverse Associations of Outdoor Activity and Vitamin D Intake With the Risk of Parkinson's Disease." Journal of Zhejiang University. Science. B, vol. 15, no. 10, 2014, pp. 923-7.
Zhu D, Liu GY, Lv Z, et al. Inverse associations of outdoor activity and vitamin D intake with the risk of Parkinson's disease. J Zhejiang Univ Sci B. 2014;15(10):923-7.
Zhu, D., Liu, G. Y., Lv, Z., Wen, S. R., Bi, S., & Wang, W. Z. (2014). Inverse associations of outdoor activity and vitamin D intake with the risk of Parkinson's disease. Journal of Zhejiang University. Science. B, 15(10), pp. 923-7. doi:10.1631/jzus.B1400005.
Zhu D, et al. Inverse Associations of Outdoor Activity and Vitamin D Intake With the Risk of Parkinson's Disease. J Zhejiang Univ Sci B. 2014;15(10):923-7. PubMed PMID: 25294382.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Inverse associations of outdoor activity and vitamin D intake with the risk of Parkinson's disease. AU - Zhu,Dan, AU - Liu,Gui-you, AU - Lv,Zheng, AU - Wen,Shi-rong, AU - Bi,Sheng, AU - Wang,Wei-zhi, PY - 2014/10/9/entrez PY - 2014/10/9/pubmed PY - 2015/11/3/medline KW - Outdoor activity KW - Parkinson’s disease KW - Vitamin D intake SP - 923 EP - 7 JF - Journal of Zhejiang University. Science. B JO - J Zhejiang Univ Sci B VL - 15 IS - 10 N2 - Early studies had suggested that vitamin D intake was inversely associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis. However, the associations of vitamin D intake and outdoor activities with Parkinson's disease (PD) are still unclear, so this study is to evaluate these relationships from a case-control study in elderly Chinese. The study population involved 209 cases with new onsets of PD and 210 controls without neurodegenerative diseases. The data on dietary vitamin D and outdoor activities were collected using a food-frequency questionnaire and self-report questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to examine the associations between dietary outdoor activities, vitamin D intake and PD. Adjustment was made for sex, age, smoking, alcohol use, education, and body mass index (BMI). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for PD in quartiles for outdoor physical activity were 1 (reference), 0.739 (0.413, 1.321), 0.501 (0.282, 0.891), and 0.437 (0.241, 0.795), respectively (P=0.002 for trend). Adjusted ORs for PD in quartiles for total vitamin D intake were 1 (reference), 0.647 (0.357, 1.170), 0.571 (0.318, 1.022), and 0.538 (0.301, 0.960), respectively (P=0.011 for trend). Our study suggested that outdoor activity and total vitamin D intake were inversely associated with PD, and outdoor activity seems to be more significantly associated with decreased risk for PD. SN - 1862-1783 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25294382/Inverse_associations_of_outdoor_activity_and_vitamin_D_intake_with_the_risk_of_Parkinson's_disease_ L2 - http://www.jzus.zju.edu.cn/article.php?doi=10.1631/jzus.B1400005 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -