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Effects of noise reduction on speech intelligibility, perceived listening effort, and personal preference in hearing-impaired listeners.
Trends Hear. 2014 Oct 13; 18TH

Abstract

This study evaluates the perceptual effects of single-microphone noise reduction in hearing aids. Twenty subjects with moderate sensorineural hearing loss listened to speech in babble noise processed via noise reduction from three different linearly fitted hearing aids. Subjects performed (a) speech-intelligibility tests, (b) listening-effort ratings, and (c) paired-comparison ratings on noise annoyance, speech naturalness, and overall preference. The perceptual effects of noise reduction differ between hearing aids. The results agree well with those of normal-hearing listeners in a previous study. None of the noise-reduction algorithms improved speech intelligibility, but all reduced the annoyance of noise. The noise reduction that scored best with respect to noise annoyance and preference had the worst intelligibility scores. The trade-off between intelligibility and listening comfort shows that preference measurements might be useful in addition to intelligibility measurements in the selection of noise reduction. Additionally, this trade-off should be taken into consideration to create realistic expectations in hearing-aid users.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clinical and Experimental Audiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands I.Brons@amc.uva.nl.Clinical and Experimental Audiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Clinical and Experimental Audiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25315377

Citation

Brons, Inge, et al. "Effects of Noise Reduction On Speech Intelligibility, Perceived Listening Effort, and Personal Preference in Hearing-impaired Listeners." Trends in Hearing, vol. 18, 2014.
Brons I, Houben R, Dreschler WA. Effects of noise reduction on speech intelligibility, perceived listening effort, and personal preference in hearing-impaired listeners. Trends Hear. 2014;18.
Brons, I., Houben, R., & Dreschler, W. A. (2014). Effects of noise reduction on speech intelligibility, perceived listening effort, and personal preference in hearing-impaired listeners. Trends in Hearing, 18. https://doi.org/10.1177/2331216514553924
Brons I, Houben R, Dreschler WA. Effects of Noise Reduction On Speech Intelligibility, Perceived Listening Effort, and Personal Preference in Hearing-impaired Listeners. Trends Hear. 2014 Oct 13;18 PubMed PMID: 25315377.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of noise reduction on speech intelligibility, perceived listening effort, and personal preference in hearing-impaired listeners. AU - Brons,Inge, AU - Houben,Rolph, AU - Dreschler,Wouter A, Y1 - 2014/10/13/ PY - 2014/10/16/entrez PY - 2014/10/16/pubmed PY - 2015/1/27/medline KW - hearing aids KW - intelligibility KW - noise reduction KW - perceived listening effort KW - preference JF - Trends in hearing JO - Trends Hear VL - 18 N2 - This study evaluates the perceptual effects of single-microphone noise reduction in hearing aids. Twenty subjects with moderate sensorineural hearing loss listened to speech in babble noise processed via noise reduction from three different linearly fitted hearing aids. Subjects performed (a) speech-intelligibility tests, (b) listening-effort ratings, and (c) paired-comparison ratings on noise annoyance, speech naturalness, and overall preference. The perceptual effects of noise reduction differ between hearing aids. The results agree well with those of normal-hearing listeners in a previous study. None of the noise-reduction algorithms improved speech intelligibility, but all reduced the annoyance of noise. The noise reduction that scored best with respect to noise annoyance and preference had the worst intelligibility scores. The trade-off between intelligibility and listening comfort shows that preference measurements might be useful in addition to intelligibility measurements in the selection of noise reduction. Additionally, this trade-off should be taken into consideration to create realistic expectations in hearing-aid users. SN - 2331-2165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25315377/Effects_of_noise_reduction_on_speech_intelligibility_perceived_listening_effort_and_personal_preference_in_hearing_impaired_listeners_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/2331216514553924?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -