Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Antibiotic resistance patterns and PCR-ribotyping of Clostridium difficile strains isolated from swine and dogs in Italy.
Anaerobe. 2015 Feb; 31:42-6.A

Abstract

Recent studies suggest animals, in particular farm and companion animals, as possible reservoir for Clostridium difficile human pathogenic strains. The aim of this study was to give a first characterization of C. difficile isolates from Italian swine and dogs. In total, 10 different PCR-ribotypes were identified among porcine strains and six among canine strains. The predominant type found among porcine strains was 078 (50%), whereas the most frequently detected among canine strains was the non-toxinogenic 010 (64%). Considering the CLSI breakpoints, 60% of porcine isolates was resistant to ERY, 35% to MXF, 15% to CLI, 5% to RIF, and none to MTZ or VAN. Among dogs, 51% of strains was resistant to CLI, 46% to ERY, 21% to MTZ and 5% to MXF or RIF, and none to VAN. Five porcine strains (10%) and 9 canine isolates (41%) were MDR. Interestingly, 8 MDR canine strains were highly resistant to MTZ, with MICs ≥32 mg/L. Considering the EUCAST cut-off for MTZ (MIC >2 mg/L), 13 canine isolates and one porcine strain were found with reduced susceptibility to MTZ (MICs ranging from 3 to ≥256 mg/L). Swine and canine strains showing resistance or reduced susceptibility to MTZ belonged to PCR-ribotype 010 and 078. These PCR-ribotypes have been associated to reduced susceptibility to MTZ also in human, suggesting a potential risk for the emergence of C. difficile strains resistant to the current first-line antibiotic for CDI treatment. The agar incorporation method (AIM) was confirmed as the best method to detect C. difficile strains with this phenotype also after strains manipulations. The results obtained add further evidences about the possible role of animals as source of MDR C. difficile strains and reservoir of antibiotic resistance determinants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Infectious, Parasitic and Immune-mediated Diseases, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: patrizia.spigaglia@iss.it.Special Bacteriology Laboratory, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, Treviso, Italy.Department of Infectious, Parasitic and Immune-mediated Diseases, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy.Department of Infectious, Parasitic and Immune-mediated Diseases, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy.Special Bacteriology Laboratory, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, Treviso, Italy.Special Bacteriology Laboratory, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, Treviso, Italy.Special Bacteriology Laboratory, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, Treviso, Italy.Special Bacteriology Laboratory, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, Treviso, Italy.Special Bacteriology Laboratory, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, Treviso, Italy.Special Bacteriology Laboratory, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, Treviso, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25316022

Citation

Spigaglia, Patrizia, et al. "Antibiotic Resistance Patterns and PCR-ribotyping of Clostridium Difficile Strains Isolated From Swine and Dogs in Italy." Anaerobe, vol. 31, 2015, pp. 42-6.
Spigaglia P, Drigo I, Barbanti F, et al. Antibiotic resistance patterns and PCR-ribotyping of Clostridium difficile strains isolated from swine and dogs in Italy. Anaerobe. 2015;31:42-6.
Spigaglia, P., Drigo, I., Barbanti, F., Mastrantonio, P., Bano, L., Bacchin, C., Puiatti, C., Tonon, E., Berto, G., & Agnoletti, F. (2015). Antibiotic resistance patterns and PCR-ribotyping of Clostridium difficile strains isolated from swine and dogs in Italy. Anaerobe, 31, 42-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anaerobe.2014.10.003
Spigaglia P, et al. Antibiotic Resistance Patterns and PCR-ribotyping of Clostridium Difficile Strains Isolated From Swine and Dogs in Italy. Anaerobe. 2015;31:42-6. PubMed PMID: 25316022.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antibiotic resistance patterns and PCR-ribotyping of Clostridium difficile strains isolated from swine and dogs in Italy. AU - Spigaglia,Patrizia, AU - Drigo,Ilenia, AU - Barbanti,Fabrizio, AU - Mastrantonio,Paola, AU - Bano,Luca, AU - Bacchin,Cosetta, AU - Puiatti,Cinzia, AU - Tonon,Elena, AU - Berto,Giacomo, AU - Agnoletti,Fabrizio, Y1 - 2014/10/12/ PY - 2014/07/01/received PY - 2014/09/24/revised PY - 2014/10/05/accepted PY - 2014/10/16/entrez PY - 2014/10/16/pubmed PY - 2015/10/29/medline KW - Animals KW - Antibiotic KW - Clostridium difficile KW - PCR-ribotyping KW - Resistance SP - 42 EP - 6 JF - Anaerobe JO - Anaerobe VL - 31 N2 - Recent studies suggest animals, in particular farm and companion animals, as possible reservoir for Clostridium difficile human pathogenic strains. The aim of this study was to give a first characterization of C. difficile isolates from Italian swine and dogs. In total, 10 different PCR-ribotypes were identified among porcine strains and six among canine strains. The predominant type found among porcine strains was 078 (50%), whereas the most frequently detected among canine strains was the non-toxinogenic 010 (64%). Considering the CLSI breakpoints, 60% of porcine isolates was resistant to ERY, 35% to MXF, 15% to CLI, 5% to RIF, and none to MTZ or VAN. Among dogs, 51% of strains was resistant to CLI, 46% to ERY, 21% to MTZ and 5% to MXF or RIF, and none to VAN. Five porcine strains (10%) and 9 canine isolates (41%) were MDR. Interestingly, 8 MDR canine strains were highly resistant to MTZ, with MICs ≥32 mg/L. Considering the EUCAST cut-off for MTZ (MIC >2 mg/L), 13 canine isolates and one porcine strain were found with reduced susceptibility to MTZ (MICs ranging from 3 to ≥256 mg/L). Swine and canine strains showing resistance or reduced susceptibility to MTZ belonged to PCR-ribotype 010 and 078. These PCR-ribotypes have been associated to reduced susceptibility to MTZ also in human, suggesting a potential risk for the emergence of C. difficile strains resistant to the current first-line antibiotic for CDI treatment. The agar incorporation method (AIM) was confirmed as the best method to detect C. difficile strains with this phenotype also after strains manipulations. The results obtained add further evidences about the possible role of animals as source of MDR C. difficile strains and reservoir of antibiotic resistance determinants. SN - 1095-8274 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25316022/Antibiotic_resistance_patterns_and_PCR_ribotyping_of_Clostridium_difficile_strains_isolated_from_swine_and_dogs_in_Italy_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1075-9964(14)00146-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -