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Resource utilization of pediatric patients exposed to venom.
Hosp Pediatr. 2014 Sep; 4(5):276-82.HP

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE

Treating envenomation with antivenom is costly. Many patients being treated with antivenom are in observation status, a billing designation for patients considered to need care that is less resource-intensive, and less expensive, than inpatient care. Observation status is also associated with lower hospital reimbursements and higher patient cost-sharing. The goal of this study was to examine resource utilization for treatment of envenomation under observation and inpatient status, and to compare patients in observation status receiving antivenom with all other patients in observation status.

METHODS

This was a retrospective study of patients with a primary diagnosis of toxic effect of venom seen during 2009 at 33 freestanding children's hospitals in the Pediatric Health Information System. Data on age, length of stay, adjusted costs (ratio cost to charges), ICU flags, and antivenom utilization were collected. Comparisons were conducted according to admission status (emergency department only, observation status, and inpatient status), and between patients in observation status receiving antivenom and patients in observation status with other diagnoses.

RESULTS

A total of 2755 patients had a primary diagnosis of toxic effect of venom. Of the 335 hospitalized, either under observation (n = 124) or inpatient (n = 211) status, 107 (31.9%) received antivenom. Of those hospitalized patients receiving antivenom, 24 (22.4%) were designated as observation status. Costs were substantially higher for patients who received antivenom and were driven by pharmacy costs (mean cost: $17 665 for observation status, $20 503 for inpatient status). Mean costs for the 47 162 patients in observation status with other diagnoses were $3001 compared with $17 665 for observation-status patients who received antivenom.

CONCLUSIONS

Treatment of envenomation with antivenom represents a high-cost outlier within observation-status hospitalizations. Observation status can have financial consequences for hospitals and patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.Children's Hospital Association, Overland Park, Kansas.C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan.Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio; and.The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania fieldston@email.chop.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25318109

Citation

Narra, Aneesha, et al. "Resource Utilization of Pediatric Patients Exposed to Venom." Hospital Pediatrics, vol. 4, no. 5, 2014, pp. 276-82.
Narra A, Lie E, Hall M, et al. Resource utilization of pediatric patients exposed to venom. Hosp Pediatr. 2014;4(5):276-82.
Narra, A., Lie, E., Hall, M., Macy, M., Alpern, E., Shah, S. S., Osterhoudt, K. C., & Fieldston, E. (2014). Resource utilization of pediatric patients exposed to venom. Hospital Pediatrics, 4(5), 276-82. https://doi.org/10.1542/hpeds.2014-0010
Narra A, et al. Resource Utilization of Pediatric Patients Exposed to Venom. Hosp Pediatr. 2014;4(5):276-82. PubMed PMID: 25318109.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Resource utilization of pediatric patients exposed to venom. AU - Narra,Aneesha, AU - Lie,Erina, AU - Hall,Matthew, AU - Macy,Michelle, AU - Alpern,Elizabeth, AU - Shah,Samir S, AU - Osterhoudt,Kevin C, AU - Fieldston,Evan, PY - 2014/10/16/entrez PY - 2014/10/16/pubmed PY - 2014/11/7/medline KW - billing KW - envenomation KW - observation status KW - pediatrics KW - reimbursements KW - resource utilization SP - 276 EP - 82 JF - Hospital pediatrics JO - Hosp Pediatr VL - 4 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Treating envenomation with antivenom is costly. Many patients being treated with antivenom are in observation status, a billing designation for patients considered to need care that is less resource-intensive, and less expensive, than inpatient care. Observation status is also associated with lower hospital reimbursements and higher patient cost-sharing. The goal of this study was to examine resource utilization for treatment of envenomation under observation and inpatient status, and to compare patients in observation status receiving antivenom with all other patients in observation status. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of patients with a primary diagnosis of toxic effect of venom seen during 2009 at 33 freestanding children's hospitals in the Pediatric Health Information System. Data on age, length of stay, adjusted costs (ratio cost to charges), ICU flags, and antivenom utilization were collected. Comparisons were conducted according to admission status (emergency department only, observation status, and inpatient status), and between patients in observation status receiving antivenom and patients in observation status with other diagnoses. RESULTS: A total of 2755 patients had a primary diagnosis of toxic effect of venom. Of the 335 hospitalized, either under observation (n = 124) or inpatient (n = 211) status, 107 (31.9%) received antivenom. Of those hospitalized patients receiving antivenom, 24 (22.4%) were designated as observation status. Costs were substantially higher for patients who received antivenom and were driven by pharmacy costs (mean cost: $17 665 for observation status, $20 503 for inpatient status). Mean costs for the 47 162 patients in observation status with other diagnoses were $3001 compared with $17 665 for observation-status patients who received antivenom. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of envenomation with antivenom represents a high-cost outlier within observation-status hospitalizations. Observation status can have financial consequences for hospitals and patients. SN - 2154-1663 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25318109/Resource_utilization_of_pediatric_patients_exposed_to_venom_ L2 - http://www.hospitalpediatrics.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=25318109 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -