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Dynamic proteomic profiles of in vivo- and in vitro-produced mouse postimplantation extraembryonic tissues and placentas.
Biol Reprod. 2014 Dec; 91(6):155.BR

Abstract

As the interface between the mother and the developing fetus, the placenta is believed to play an important role in assisted reproductive technology (ART)-induced aberrant intrauterine and postnatal development. However, the mechanisms underlying aberrant placentation remain unclear, especially during extraembryonic tissue development and early stages of placental formation. Using a mouse model, this investigation provides the first comparative proteomic analysis of in vivo (IVO) and in vitro-produced (IVP) extraembryonic tissues and placentas after IVO fertilization and development, or in vitro fertilization and culture, respectively. We identified 165 and 178 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) between IVO and IVP extraembryonic tissues and placentas on Embryonic Day 7.5 (E7.5) and E10.5, respectively. Many DEPs were functionally associated with genetic information processing, such as impaired de novo DNA methylation, as well as posttranscriptional, translational and posttranslational dysregulation. These novel findings were further confirmed by global hypomethylation, and a lower level of correlation was found between the transcriptome and proteome in the IVP groups. In addition, numerous DEPs were involved in energy and amino acid metabolism, cytoskeleton organization and transport, and vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. These disturbed processes and pathways are likely to be associated with embryonic intrauterine growth restriction, an enlarged placenta, and impaired labyrinth morphogenesis. This study provides a direct and comprehensive reference for the further exploration of the placental mechanisms that underlie ART-induced developmental aberrations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Sciences and Technology, China Agricultural University, Haidian, Beijing, China.Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Sciences and Technology, China Agricultural University, Haidian, Beijing, China.Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Sciences and Technology, China Agricultural University, Haidian, Beijing, China.Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Sciences and Technology, China Agricultural University, Haidian, Beijing, China.Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Sciences and Technology, China Agricultural University, Haidian, Beijing, China.Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Sciences and Technology, China Agricultural University, Haidian, Beijing, China.Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Sciences and Technology, China Agricultural University, Haidian, Beijing, China.Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Sciences and Technology, China Agricultural University, Haidian, Beijing, China.Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Sciences and Technology, China Agricultural University, Haidian, Beijing, China.Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Sciences and Technology, China Agricultural University, Haidian, Beijing, China.Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Sciences and Technology, China Agricultural University, Haidian, Beijing, China.BGI Tech Solutions Co., Ltd., Beishan Industrial Zone, Shenzhen, China.BGI Tech Solutions Co., Ltd., Beishan Industrial Zone, Shenzhen, China.Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Sciences and Technology, China Agricultural University, Haidian, Beijing, China.Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Sciences and Technology, China Agricultural University, Haidian, Beijing, China zchou@cau.edu.cn.Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, National Engineering Laboratory for Animal Breeding, College of Animal Sciences and Technology, China Agricultural University, Haidian, Beijing, China tianjh@cau.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25320150

Citation

Sui, Linlin, et al. "Dynamic Proteomic Profiles of in Vivo- and in Vitro-produced Mouse Postimplantation Extraembryonic Tissues and Placentas." Biology of Reproduction, vol. 91, no. 6, 2014, p. 155.
Sui L, An L, Tan K, et al. Dynamic proteomic profiles of in vivo- and in vitro-produced mouse postimplantation extraembryonic tissues and placentas. Biol Reprod. 2014;91(6):155.
Sui, L., An, L., Tan, K., Wang, Z., Wang, S., Miao, K., Ren, L., Tao, L., He, S., Yu, Y., Nie, J., Liu, Q., Xing, L., Wu, Z., Hou, Z., & Tian, J. (2014). Dynamic proteomic profiles of in vivo- and in vitro-produced mouse postimplantation extraembryonic tissues and placentas. Biology of Reproduction, 91(6), 155. https://doi.org/10.1095/biolreprod.114.124248
Sui L, et al. Dynamic Proteomic Profiles of in Vivo- and in Vitro-produced Mouse Postimplantation Extraembryonic Tissues and Placentas. Biol Reprod. 2014;91(6):155. PubMed PMID: 25320150.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dynamic proteomic profiles of in vivo- and in vitro-produced mouse postimplantation extraembryonic tissues and placentas. AU - Sui,Linlin, AU - An,Lei, AU - Tan,Kun, AU - Wang,Zhuqing, AU - Wang,Shumin, AU - Miao,Kai, AU - Ren,Likun, AU - Tao,Li, AU - He,Shuzhi, AU - Yu,Yong, AU - Nie,Jinzhou, AU - Liu,Qian, AU - Xing,Lei, AU - Wu,Zhonghong, AU - Hou,Zhuocheng, AU - Tian,Jianhui, Y1 - 2014/10/15/ PY - 2014/10/17/entrez PY - 2014/10/17/pubmed PY - 2015/8/25/medline KW - assisted reproductive technology KW - extraembryonic tissues KW - in vitro fertilization KW - placenta KW - proteome SP - 155 EP - 155 JF - Biology of reproduction JO - Biol. Reprod. VL - 91 IS - 6 N2 - As the interface between the mother and the developing fetus, the placenta is believed to play an important role in assisted reproductive technology (ART)-induced aberrant intrauterine and postnatal development. However, the mechanisms underlying aberrant placentation remain unclear, especially during extraembryonic tissue development and early stages of placental formation. Using a mouse model, this investigation provides the first comparative proteomic analysis of in vivo (IVO) and in vitro-produced (IVP) extraembryonic tissues and placentas after IVO fertilization and development, or in vitro fertilization and culture, respectively. We identified 165 and 178 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) between IVO and IVP extraembryonic tissues and placentas on Embryonic Day 7.5 (E7.5) and E10.5, respectively. Many DEPs were functionally associated with genetic information processing, such as impaired de novo DNA methylation, as well as posttranscriptional, translational and posttranslational dysregulation. These novel findings were further confirmed by global hypomethylation, and a lower level of correlation was found between the transcriptome and proteome in the IVP groups. In addition, numerous DEPs were involved in energy and amino acid metabolism, cytoskeleton organization and transport, and vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. These disturbed processes and pathways are likely to be associated with embryonic intrauterine growth restriction, an enlarged placenta, and impaired labyrinth morphogenesis. This study provides a direct and comprehensive reference for the further exploration of the placental mechanisms that underlie ART-induced developmental aberrations. SN - 1529-7268 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25320150/Dynamic_proteomic_profiles_of_in_vivo__and_in_vitro_produced_mouse_postimplantation_extraembryonic_tissues_and_placentas_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/biolreprod/article-lookup/doi/10.1095/biolreprod.114.124248 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -