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Varying strength of cognitive markers and biomarkers to predict conversion and cognitive decline in an early-stage-enriched mild cognitive impairment sample.
J Alzheimers Dis 2015; 44(2):625-33JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Several cognitive, neuroimaging, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers predict conversion from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia. However, predictors might be more or less powerful depending on the characteristics of the MCI sample.

OBJECTIVE

To investigate which cognitive markers and biomarkers predict conversion to AD dementia and course of cognitive functioning in a MCI sample with a high proportion of early-stage MCI patients.

METHODS

Variables known to predict progression in MCI patients and hypothesized to predict progression in early-stage MCI patients were selected. Cognitive (long-delay free recall, regional primacy score), imaging (hippocampal and entorhinal cortex volumes, fornix fractional anisotropy), and CSF (Aβ1-42/t-tau, Aβ1-42) variables from 36 MCI patients were analyzed with Cox regression and mixed-effect models to determine their individual and combined abilities to predict time to conversion to AD dementia and course of global cognitive functioning, respectively.

RESULTS

Those variables hypothesized to predict the course of early-stage MCI patients were most predictive for MCI progression. Specifically, regional primacy score (a measure of word-list position learning) most consistently predicted conversion to AD dementia and course of cognitive functioning. Both the prediction of conversion and course of cognitive functioning were maximized by including CSF Aβ1-42 and fornix integrity biomarkers, respectively, indicating the complementary information carried by cognitive variables and biomarkers.

CONCLUSION

Predictors of MCI progression need to be interpreted in light of the characteristics of the respective MCI sample. Future studies should aim to compare predictive strengths of markers between early-stage and late-stage MCI patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Memory Clinic, University Center for Medicine of Aging Basel, Felix Platter-Hospital, Basel, Switzerland.Memory Clinic, University Center for Medicine of Aging Basel, Felix Platter-Hospital, Basel, Switzerland.Memory Clinic, University Center for Medicine of Aging Basel, Felix Platter-Hospital, Basel, Switzerland Centre for Speech, Language and the Brain, Department of Experimental Psychology, Cambridge, UK.Department of Mathematics and Technology, University of Applied Sciences Koblenz, Koblenz, Germany.Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.Department of Neurology, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany.Memory Clinic, University Center for Medicine of Aging Basel, Felix Platter-Hospital, Basel, Switzerland.Memory Clinic, University Center for Medicine of Aging Basel, Felix Platter-Hospital, Basel, Switzerland Department of Neurology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25322924

Citation

Egli, Simone C., et al. "Varying Strength of Cognitive Markers and Biomarkers to Predict Conversion and Cognitive Decline in an Early-stage-enriched Mild Cognitive Impairment Sample." Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, vol. 44, no. 2, 2015, pp. 625-33.
Egli SC, Hirni DI, Taylor KI, et al. Varying strength of cognitive markers and biomarkers to predict conversion and cognitive decline in an early-stage-enriched mild cognitive impairment sample. J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;44(2):625-33.
Egli, S. C., Hirni, D. I., Taylor, K. I., Berres, M., Regeniter, A., Gass, A., ... Sollberger, M. (2015). Varying strength of cognitive markers and biomarkers to predict conversion and cognitive decline in an early-stage-enriched mild cognitive impairment sample. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, 44(2), pp. 625-33. doi:10.3233/JAD-141716.
Egli SC, et al. Varying Strength of Cognitive Markers and Biomarkers to Predict Conversion and Cognitive Decline in an Early-stage-enriched Mild Cognitive Impairment Sample. J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;44(2):625-33. PubMed PMID: 25322924.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Varying strength of cognitive markers and biomarkers to predict conversion and cognitive decline in an early-stage-enriched mild cognitive impairment sample. AU - Egli,Simone C, AU - Hirni,Daniela I, AU - Taylor,Kirsten I, AU - Berres,Manfred, AU - Regeniter,Axel, AU - Gass,Achim, AU - Monsch,Andreas U, AU - Sollberger,Marc, PY - 2014/10/18/entrez PY - 2014/10/18/pubmed PY - 2015/9/22/medline KW - Alzheimer's disease KW - amyloid KW - cerebrospinal fluid KW - dementia KW - diffusion tensor imaging KW - fornix (brain) KW - magnetic resonance imaging KW - memory KW - mild cognitive impairment SP - 625 EP - 33 JF - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD JO - J. Alzheimers Dis. VL - 44 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Several cognitive, neuroimaging, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers predict conversion from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia. However, predictors might be more or less powerful depending on the characteristics of the MCI sample. OBJECTIVE: To investigate which cognitive markers and biomarkers predict conversion to AD dementia and course of cognitive functioning in a MCI sample with a high proportion of early-stage MCI patients. METHODS: Variables known to predict progression in MCI patients and hypothesized to predict progression in early-stage MCI patients were selected. Cognitive (long-delay free recall, regional primacy score), imaging (hippocampal and entorhinal cortex volumes, fornix fractional anisotropy), and CSF (Aβ1-42/t-tau, Aβ1-42) variables from 36 MCI patients were analyzed with Cox regression and mixed-effect models to determine their individual and combined abilities to predict time to conversion to AD dementia and course of global cognitive functioning, respectively. RESULTS: Those variables hypothesized to predict the course of early-stage MCI patients were most predictive for MCI progression. Specifically, regional primacy score (a measure of word-list position learning) most consistently predicted conversion to AD dementia and course of cognitive functioning. Both the prediction of conversion and course of cognitive functioning were maximized by including CSF Aβ1-42 and fornix integrity biomarkers, respectively, indicating the complementary information carried by cognitive variables and biomarkers. CONCLUSION: Predictors of MCI progression need to be interpreted in light of the characteristics of the respective MCI sample. Future studies should aim to compare predictive strengths of markers between early-stage and late-stage MCI patients. SN - 1875-8908 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25322924/Varying_strength_of_cognitive_markers_and_biomarkers_to_predict_conversion_and_cognitive_decline_in_an_early_stage_enriched_mild_cognitive_impairment_sample_ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&id=doi:10.3233/JAD-141716 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -