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The severity of irritable bowel syndrome or the presence of fibromyalgia influencing the perception of visceral and somatic stimuli.
BMC Gastroenterol. 2014 Oct 17; 14:182.BG

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) is a frequent comorbidity in Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) patients with a higher functional bowel disorder severity index (FBDSI). We tested the possibility that mild to severe IBS patients without FMS would have a graduated visceral and somatic perception, and the presence of FMS would further enhance somatic, but conversely attenuate visceral perception.Our aim was to study visceral and somatic sensitivity in mild IBS patients and in severe IBS patients with or without FMS.

METHODS

Eleven mild IBS and 19 severe IBS with and without FMS patients were studied. Somatic and visceral stimuli were applied in each patient by means of electrical stimulations at active and control sites and by means of an electronic barostat in the rectum. Thresholds for discomfort and perception cumulative scores were measured.

RESULTS

Mild and severe IBS patients without FMS demonstrated a significantly lower somatic perception cumulative score than severe IBS patients with FMS at active site. Conversely only severe IBS patients without FMS had significantly lower visceral thresholds for discomfort than mild IBS patients and severe IBS patients with FMS.

CONCLUSIONS

The presence of co-existing FMS or greater FBDSI affects somatic and visceral perception in a graded fashion across IBS patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableGastrointestinal Unit, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Via S, Allende, 84081 Baronissi, SA, Italy. piovino@unisa.it.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25323092

Citation

Tremolaterra, Fabrizio, et al. "The Severity of Irritable Bowel Syndrome or the Presence of Fibromyalgia Influencing the Perception of Visceral and Somatic Stimuli." BMC Gastroenterology, vol. 14, 2014, p. 182.
Tremolaterra F, Gallotta S, Morra Y, et al. The severity of irritable bowel syndrome or the presence of fibromyalgia influencing the perception of visceral and somatic stimuli. BMC Gastroenterol. 2014;14:182.
Tremolaterra, F., Gallotta, S., Morra, Y., Lubrano, E., Ciacci, C., & Iovino, P. (2014). The severity of irritable bowel syndrome or the presence of fibromyalgia influencing the perception of visceral and somatic stimuli. BMC Gastroenterology, 14, 182. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-230X-14-182
Tremolaterra F, et al. The Severity of Irritable Bowel Syndrome or the Presence of Fibromyalgia Influencing the Perception of Visceral and Somatic Stimuli. BMC Gastroenterol. 2014 Oct 17;14:182. PubMed PMID: 25323092.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The severity of irritable bowel syndrome or the presence of fibromyalgia influencing the perception of visceral and somatic stimuli. AU - Tremolaterra,Fabrizio, AU - Gallotta,Serena, AU - Morra,Yvonne, AU - Lubrano,Ennio, AU - Ciacci,Carolina, AU - Iovino,Paola, Y1 - 2014/10/17/ PY - 2013/06/15/received PY - 2014/10/09/accepted PY - 2014/10/18/entrez PY - 2014/10/18/pubmed PY - 2015/6/9/medline SP - 182 EP - 182 JF - BMC gastroenterology JO - BMC Gastroenterol VL - 14 N2 - BACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) is a frequent comorbidity in Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) patients with a higher functional bowel disorder severity index (FBDSI). We tested the possibility that mild to severe IBS patients without FMS would have a graduated visceral and somatic perception, and the presence of FMS would further enhance somatic, but conversely attenuate visceral perception.Our aim was to study visceral and somatic sensitivity in mild IBS patients and in severe IBS patients with or without FMS. METHODS: Eleven mild IBS and 19 severe IBS with and without FMS patients were studied. Somatic and visceral stimuli were applied in each patient by means of electrical stimulations at active and control sites and by means of an electronic barostat in the rectum. Thresholds for discomfort and perception cumulative scores were measured. RESULTS: Mild and severe IBS patients without FMS demonstrated a significantly lower somatic perception cumulative score than severe IBS patients with FMS at active site. Conversely only severe IBS patients without FMS had significantly lower visceral thresholds for discomfort than mild IBS patients and severe IBS patients with FMS. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of co-existing FMS or greater FBDSI affects somatic and visceral perception in a graded fashion across IBS patients. SN - 1471-230X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25323092/The_severity_of_irritable_bowel_syndrome_or_the_presence_of_fibromyalgia_influencing_the_perception_of_visceral_and_somatic_stimuli_ L2 - https://bmcgastroenterol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-230X-14-182 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -