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Intake of dietary flavonoids and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Nov; 100(5):1344-51.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The impact of different dietary flavonoid subclasses on risk of epithelial ovarian cancer is unclear, with limited previous studies that have focused on only a few compounds.

OBJECTIVE

We prospectively examined associations between habitual flavonoid subclass intake and risk of ovarian cancer.

DESIGN

We followed 171,940 Nurses' Health Study and Nurses' Health Study II participants to examine associations between intakes of total flavonoids and their subclasses (flavanones, flavonols, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols, flavones, and polymeric flavonoids) and risk of ovarian cancer by using Cox proportional hazards models. Intake was calculated from validated food-frequency questionnaires collected every 4 y.

RESULTS

During 16-22 y of follow-up, 723 cases of ovarian cancer were confirmed through medical records. In pooled multivariate-adjusted analyses, total flavonoids were not statistically significantly associated with ovarian cancer risk (HR for the top compared with the bottom quintile: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.66, 1.09; P-trend = 0.17). However, participants in the highest quintiles of flavonol and flavanone intakes had modestly lower risk of ovarian cancer than did participants in the lowest quintile, although the P-trend was not significant [HRs: 0.76 (95% CI: 0.59, 0.98; P-trend = 0.11) and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.63,1.00; P-trend = 0.26), respectively]. The association for flavanone intake was stronger for serous invasive and poorly differentiated tumors (comparable HR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.50, 0.92; P-heterogeneity = 0.10, P-trend = 0.07) compared with nonserous and less-aggressive tumors. Intakes of other subclasses were not significantly associated with risk. In food-based analyses used to compare subjects who consumed >1 and ≤ 1 cup black tea/d, the HR was 0.68 (95% CI: 0.51, 0.90; P < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Higher intakes of flavonols and flavanones as well as black tea consumption may be associated with lower risk of ovarian cancer. Additional prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Department of Nutrition, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom (AC); the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (TH, MSR, EBR, and SST); and the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (TH, MSR, EBR, and SST).From the Department of Nutrition, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom (AC); the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (TH, MSR, EBR, and SST); and the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (TH, MSR, EBR, and SST).From the Department of Nutrition, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom (AC); the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (TH, MSR, EBR, and SST); and the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (TH, MSR, EBR, and SST).From the Department of Nutrition, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom (AC); the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (TH, MSR, EBR, and SST); and the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (TH, MSR, EBR, and SST).From the Department of Nutrition, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom (AC); the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (TH, MSR, EBR, and SST); and the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (TH, MSR, EBR, and SST).

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25332332

Citation

Cassidy, Aedín, et al. "Intake of Dietary Flavonoids and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 100, no. 5, 2014, pp. 1344-51.
Cassidy A, Huang T, Rice MS, et al. Intake of dietary flavonoids and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;100(5):1344-51.
Cassidy, A., Huang, T., Rice, M. S., Rimm, E. B., & Tworoger, S. S. (2014). Intake of dietary flavonoids and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 100(5), 1344-51. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.114.088708
Cassidy A, et al. Intake of Dietary Flavonoids and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;100(5):1344-51. PubMed PMID: 25332332.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intake of dietary flavonoids and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. AU - Cassidy,Aedín, AU - Huang,Tianyi, AU - Rice,Megan S, AU - Rimm,Eric B, AU - Tworoger,Shelley S, Y1 - 2014/08/20/ PY - 2014/10/22/entrez PY - 2014/10/22/pubmed PY - 2015/2/24/medline SP - 1344 EP - 51 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 100 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: The impact of different dietary flavonoid subclasses on risk of epithelial ovarian cancer is unclear, with limited previous studies that have focused on only a few compounds. OBJECTIVE: We prospectively examined associations between habitual flavonoid subclass intake and risk of ovarian cancer. DESIGN: We followed 171,940 Nurses' Health Study and Nurses' Health Study II participants to examine associations between intakes of total flavonoids and their subclasses (flavanones, flavonols, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols, flavones, and polymeric flavonoids) and risk of ovarian cancer by using Cox proportional hazards models. Intake was calculated from validated food-frequency questionnaires collected every 4 y. RESULTS: During 16-22 y of follow-up, 723 cases of ovarian cancer were confirmed through medical records. In pooled multivariate-adjusted analyses, total flavonoids were not statistically significantly associated with ovarian cancer risk (HR for the top compared with the bottom quintile: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.66, 1.09; P-trend = 0.17). However, participants in the highest quintiles of flavonol and flavanone intakes had modestly lower risk of ovarian cancer than did participants in the lowest quintile, although the P-trend was not significant [HRs: 0.76 (95% CI: 0.59, 0.98; P-trend = 0.11) and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.63,1.00; P-trend = 0.26), respectively]. The association for flavanone intake was stronger for serous invasive and poorly differentiated tumors (comparable HR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.50, 0.92; P-heterogeneity = 0.10, P-trend = 0.07) compared with nonserous and less-aggressive tumors. Intakes of other subclasses were not significantly associated with risk. In food-based analyses used to compare subjects who consumed >1 and ≤ 1 cup black tea/d, the HR was 0.68 (95% CI: 0.51, 0.90; P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Higher intakes of flavonols and flavanones as well as black tea consumption may be associated with lower risk of ovarian cancer. Additional prospective studies are required to confirm these findings. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25332332/Intake_of_dietary_flavonoids_and_risk_of_epithelial_ovarian_cancer_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.114.088708 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -