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Weaker circadian activity rhythms are associated with poorer executive function in older women.
Sleep. 2014 Dec 01; 37(12):2009-16.S

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES

Older adults and patients with dementia often have disrupted circadian activity rhythms (CARs). Disrupted CARs are associated with health declines and could affect cognitive aging. We hypothesized that among older women, weaker CARs would be associated with poorer cognitive function 5 y later.

DESIGN

Prospective observational study.

SETTING

Three US clinical sites.

PARTICIPANTS

There were 1,287 community-dwelling older women (82.8 ± 3.1 y) participating in an ongoing prospective study who were free of dementia at the baseline visit.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS

Baseline actigraphy was used to determine CAR measures (amplitude, mesor, and rhythm robustness, analyzed as quartiles; acrophase analyzed by peak activity time < 13:34 and > 15:51). Five years later, cognitive performance was assessed with the Modified Mini-Mental Status Examination (3MS), California Verbal Learning Task (CVLT), digit span, Trail Making Test B (Trails B), categorical fluency, and letter fluency. We compared cognitive performance with CARs using analyses of covariance adjusted for a number of health factors and comorbidities. Women in the lowest quartile for CAR amplitude performed worse on Trails B and categorical fluency compared to women in the highest quartile (group difference (d) = 30.42 sec, d = -1.01 words respectively, P < 0.05). Women in the lowest quartile for mesor performed worse on categorical fluency (d = -0.86 words, P < 0.05). Women with a later acrophase performed worse on categorical fluency (d = -0.69 words, P < 0.05). Controlling for baseline Mini-Mental State Examination and sleep factors had little effect on our results.

CONCLUSION

Weaker circadian activity rhythm patterns are associated with worse cognitive function, especially executive function, in older women without dementia. Further investigation is required to determine the etiology of these relationships.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, CA: San Francisco Veterans Administration, San Francisco, CA.California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, CA.California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, CA.California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, CA.Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA.Harvard Medical School, Division of Sleep Medicine, Boston, MA: Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA: Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA.School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, CA: Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, CA.Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, CA: San Francisco Veterans Administration, San Francisco, CA: Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, CA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25337947

Citation

Walsh, Christine M., et al. "Weaker Circadian Activity Rhythms Are Associated With Poorer Executive Function in Older Women." Sleep, vol. 37, no. 12, 2014, pp. 2009-16.
Walsh CM, Blackwell T, Tranah GJ, et al. Weaker circadian activity rhythms are associated with poorer executive function in older women. Sleep. 2014;37(12):2009-16.
Walsh, C. M., Blackwell, T., Tranah, G. J., Stone, K. L., Ancoli-Israel, S., Redline, S., Paudel, M., Kramer, J. H., & Yaffe, K. (2014). Weaker circadian activity rhythms are associated with poorer executive function in older women. Sleep, 37(12), 2009-16. https://doi.org/10.5665/sleep.4260
Walsh CM, et al. Weaker Circadian Activity Rhythms Are Associated With Poorer Executive Function in Older Women. Sleep. 2014 Dec 1;37(12):2009-16. PubMed PMID: 25337947.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Weaker circadian activity rhythms are associated with poorer executive function in older women. AU - Walsh,Christine M, AU - Blackwell,Terri, AU - Tranah,Gregory J, AU - Stone,Katie L, AU - Ancoli-Israel,Sonia, AU - Redline,Susan, AU - Paudel,Misti, AU - Kramer,Joel H, AU - Yaffe,Kristine, Y1 - 2014/12/01/ PY - 2013/12/18/received PY - 2014/07/03/accepted PY - 2014/10/23/entrez PY - 2014/10/23/pubmed PY - 2015/8/8/medline KW - actigraphy KW - cognition KW - cognitive impairment KW - executive function KW - verbal memory SP - 2009 EP - 16 JF - Sleep JO - Sleep VL - 37 IS - 12 N2 - STUDY OBJECTIVES: Older adults and patients with dementia often have disrupted circadian activity rhythms (CARs). Disrupted CARs are associated with health declines and could affect cognitive aging. We hypothesized that among older women, weaker CARs would be associated with poorer cognitive function 5 y later. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Three US clinical sites. PARTICIPANTS: There were 1,287 community-dwelling older women (82.8 ± 3.1 y) participating in an ongoing prospective study who were free of dementia at the baseline visit. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Baseline actigraphy was used to determine CAR measures (amplitude, mesor, and rhythm robustness, analyzed as quartiles; acrophase analyzed by peak activity time < 13:34 and > 15:51). Five years later, cognitive performance was assessed with the Modified Mini-Mental Status Examination (3MS), California Verbal Learning Task (CVLT), digit span, Trail Making Test B (Trails B), categorical fluency, and letter fluency. We compared cognitive performance with CARs using analyses of covariance adjusted for a number of health factors and comorbidities. Women in the lowest quartile for CAR amplitude performed worse on Trails B and categorical fluency compared to women in the highest quartile (group difference (d) = 30.42 sec, d = -1.01 words respectively, P < 0.05). Women in the lowest quartile for mesor performed worse on categorical fluency (d = -0.86 words, P < 0.05). Women with a later acrophase performed worse on categorical fluency (d = -0.69 words, P < 0.05). Controlling for baseline Mini-Mental State Examination and sleep factors had little effect on our results. CONCLUSION: Weaker circadian activity rhythm patterns are associated with worse cognitive function, especially executive function, in older women without dementia. Further investigation is required to determine the etiology of these relationships. SN - 1550-9109 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25337947/Weaker_circadian_activity_rhythms_are_associated_with_poorer_executive_function_in_older_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article-lookup/doi/10.5665/sleep.4260 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -