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Competitive reduction of perferrylmyoglobin radicals by protein thiols and plant phenols.
J Agric Food Chem. 2014 Nov 19; 62(46):11279-88.JA

Abstract

Radical transfer from perferrylmyoglobin to other target species (myofibrillar proteins, MPI) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), extracts from green tea (GTE), maté (ME), and rosemary (RE), and three phenolic compounds, catechin, caffeic acid, and carnosic acid) was investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine the concentrations of plant extracts required to protect against protein oxidation. Blocking of MPI thiol groups by N-ethylmaleimide was found to reduce the rate of reaction of MPI with perferrylmyoglobin radicals, signifying the importance of protein thiols as radical scavengers. GTE had the highest phenolic content of the three extracts and was most effective as a radical scavenger. IC50 values indicated that the molar ratio between phenols in plant extract and MPI thiols needs to be >15 in order to obtain efficient protection against protein-to-protein radical transfer in meat. Caffeic acid was found most effective among the plant phenols.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food Science, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen , Rolighedsvej 30, 1958 Frederiksberg, Denmark.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25343706

Citation

Jongberg, Sisse, et al. "Competitive Reduction of Perferrylmyoglobin Radicals By Protein Thiols and Plant Phenols." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 62, no. 46, 2014, pp. 11279-88.
Jongberg S, Lund MN, Skibsted LH, et al. Competitive reduction of perferrylmyoglobin radicals by protein thiols and plant phenols. J Agric Food Chem. 2014;62(46):11279-88.
Jongberg, S., Lund, M. N., Skibsted, L. H., & Davies, M. J. (2014). Competitive reduction of perferrylmyoglobin radicals by protein thiols and plant phenols. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 62(46), 11279-88. https://doi.org/10.1021/jf5041433
Jongberg S, et al. Competitive Reduction of Perferrylmyoglobin Radicals By Protein Thiols and Plant Phenols. J Agric Food Chem. 2014 Nov 19;62(46):11279-88. PubMed PMID: 25343706.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Competitive reduction of perferrylmyoglobin radicals by protein thiols and plant phenols. AU - Jongberg,Sisse, AU - Lund,Marianne N, AU - Skibsted,Leif H, AU - Davies,Michael J, Y1 - 2014/11/10/ PY - 2014/10/25/entrez PY - 2014/10/25/pubmed PY - 2015/8/14/medline KW - myofibrillar proteins KW - myoglobin KW - plant phenols KW - protein oxidation KW - protein radicals SP - 11279 EP - 88 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 62 IS - 46 N2 - Radical transfer from perferrylmyoglobin to other target species (myofibrillar proteins, MPI) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), extracts from green tea (GTE), maté (ME), and rosemary (RE), and three phenolic compounds, catechin, caffeic acid, and carnosic acid) was investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine the concentrations of plant extracts required to protect against protein oxidation. Blocking of MPI thiol groups by N-ethylmaleimide was found to reduce the rate of reaction of MPI with perferrylmyoglobin radicals, signifying the importance of protein thiols as radical scavengers. GTE had the highest phenolic content of the three extracts and was most effective as a radical scavenger. IC50 values indicated that the molar ratio between phenols in plant extract and MPI thiols needs to be >15 in order to obtain efficient protection against protein-to-protein radical transfer in meat. Caffeic acid was found most effective among the plant phenols. SN - 1520-5118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25343706/Competitive_reduction_of_perferrylmyoglobin_radicals_by_protein_thiols_and_plant_phenols_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/jf5041433 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -