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Overall and abdominal adiposity and premenopausal breast cancer risk among hispanic women: the breast cancer health disparities study.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2015 Jan; 24(1):138-47.CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Few studies in Hispanic women have examined the relation between adult body size and risk of premenopausal breast cancer defined by hormone receptor status.

METHODS

The Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study pooled interview and anthropometric data from two large U.S. population-based case-control studies. We examined associations of overall and abdominal adiposity with risk of estrogen receptor- and progesterone receptor-positive (ER(+)PR(+)) and -negative (ER(-)PR(-)) breast cancer in Hispanic and non-Hispanic White (NHW) women, calculating ORs and 95% confidence intervals.

RESULTS

Among Hispanics, risk of ER(+)PR(+) breast cancer was inversely associated with measures of overall adiposity, including young-adult and current body mass index (BMI). Risk was substantially reduced among those with high (above the median) young-adult BMI and current overweight or obesity. The findings for overall adiposity were similar for Hispanics and NHWs. In the subset of Hispanics with data on genetic ancestry, inverse associations of current BMI, and weight gain with ER(+)PR(+) breast cancer were limited to those with lower Indigenous American ancestry. For ER(-)PR(-) breast cancer, height was associated with increased risk, and young-adult BMI was associated with reduced risk. For all breast cancers combined, positive associations were seen for waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, and waist-to-height ratio in Hispanic women only.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings of body size associations with specific breast cancer subtypes among premenopausal Hispanic women were similar to those reported for NHW women.

IMPACT

Adiposity throughout the premenopausal years has a major influence on breast cancer risk in Hispanic women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, California. Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Research and Policy and Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California. Esther.John@cpic.org.Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, California.Department of Biology, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, Colorado.Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, School of Public Health and Information Sciences, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky.Moffitt Cancer Center, Cancer Prevention and Control, Tampa, Florida.Department of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah.Department of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25352526

Citation

John, Esther M., et al. "Overall and Abdominal Adiposity and Premenopausal Breast Cancer Risk Among Hispanic Women: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 24, no. 1, 2015, pp. 138-47.
John EM, Sangaramoorthy M, Hines LM, et al. Overall and abdominal adiposity and premenopausal breast cancer risk among hispanic women: the breast cancer health disparities study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2015;24(1):138-47.
John, E. M., Sangaramoorthy, M., Hines, L. M., Stern, M. C., Baumgartner, K. B., Giuliano, A. R., Wolff, R. K., & Slattery, M. L. (2015). Overall and abdominal adiposity and premenopausal breast cancer risk among hispanic women: the breast cancer health disparities study. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 24(1), 138-47. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-1007-T
John EM, et al. Overall and Abdominal Adiposity and Premenopausal Breast Cancer Risk Among Hispanic Women: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2015;24(1):138-47. PubMed PMID: 25352526.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Overall and abdominal adiposity and premenopausal breast cancer risk among hispanic women: the breast cancer health disparities study. AU - John,Esther M, AU - Sangaramoorthy,Meera, AU - Hines,Lisa M, AU - Stern,Mariana C, AU - Baumgartner,Kathy B, AU - Giuliano,Anna R, AU - Wolff,Roger K, AU - Slattery,Martha L, Y1 - 2014/10/28/ PY - 2014/10/30/entrez PY - 2014/10/30/pubmed PY - 2015/9/19/medline SP - 138 EP - 47 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 24 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Few studies in Hispanic women have examined the relation between adult body size and risk of premenopausal breast cancer defined by hormone receptor status. METHODS: The Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study pooled interview and anthropometric data from two large U.S. population-based case-control studies. We examined associations of overall and abdominal adiposity with risk of estrogen receptor- and progesterone receptor-positive (ER(+)PR(+)) and -negative (ER(-)PR(-)) breast cancer in Hispanic and non-Hispanic White (NHW) women, calculating ORs and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Among Hispanics, risk of ER(+)PR(+) breast cancer was inversely associated with measures of overall adiposity, including young-adult and current body mass index (BMI). Risk was substantially reduced among those with high (above the median) young-adult BMI and current overweight or obesity. The findings for overall adiposity were similar for Hispanics and NHWs. In the subset of Hispanics with data on genetic ancestry, inverse associations of current BMI, and weight gain with ER(+)PR(+) breast cancer were limited to those with lower Indigenous American ancestry. For ER(-)PR(-) breast cancer, height was associated with increased risk, and young-adult BMI was associated with reduced risk. For all breast cancers combined, positive associations were seen for waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, and waist-to-height ratio in Hispanic women only. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings of body size associations with specific breast cancer subtypes among premenopausal Hispanic women were similar to those reported for NHW women. IMPACT: Adiposity throughout the premenopausal years has a major influence on breast cancer risk in Hispanic women. SN - 1538-7755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25352526/Overall_and_abdominal_adiposity_and_premenopausal_breast_cancer_risk_among_hispanic_women:_the_breast_cancer_health_disparities_study_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=25352526 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -