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Effects of dietary fat and saturated fat content on liver fat and markers of oxidative stress in overweight/obese men and women under weight-stable conditions.

Abstract

Dietary fat and oxidative stress are hypothesized to contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and progression to steatohepatitis. To determine the effects of dietary fat content on hepatic triglyceride, body fat distribution and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, overweight/obese subjects with normal glucose tolerance consumed a control diet (CONT: 35% fat/12% saturated fat/47% carbohydrate) for ten days, followed by four weeks on a low fat (LFD (n = 10): 20% fat/8% saturated fat/62% carbohydrate) or high fat diet (HFD (n = 10): 55% fat/25% saturated fat/27% carbohydrate). Hepatic triglyceride content was quantified by MRS and abdominal fat distribution by MRI. Fasting biomarkers of inflammation (plasma hsCRP, IL-6, IL-12, TNFα, IFN-γ) and oxidative stress (urinary F2-α isoprostanes) were measured. Body weight remained stable. Compared to the CONT, hepatic triglyceride decreased on the LFD (mean (95% CI): change -2.13% (-3.74%, -0.52%)), but did not change on the HFD and there was no significant difference between the LFD and HFD. Intra-abdominal fat did not change significantly on either diet, but subcutaneous abdominal fat increased on the HFD. There were no significant changes in fasting metabolic markers, inflammatory markers and urinary F2-α isoprostanes. We conclude that in otherwise healthy overweight/obese adults under weight-neutral conditions, a diet low in fat and saturated fat has modest effects to decrease liver fat and may be beneficial. On the other hand, a diet very high in fat and saturated fat had no effect on hepatic triglyceride or markers of metabolism, inflammation and oxidative stress.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. annam45@hotmail.com.

    ,

    Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. anize.frankenberg@gmail.com.

    ,

    Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. sedasuv@yahoo.com.

    ,

    School of Medicine, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. hcal@uw.edu.

    ,

    Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. mkratz@fhcrc.org.

    ,

    Department of Radiology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. toddr@u.washington.edu.

    Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. kutzschn@u.washington.edu.

    Source

    Nutrients 6:11 2014 Oct 28 pg 4678-90

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Biomarkers
    C-Reactive Protein
    Diet Records
    Diet, High-Fat
    Dietary Fats
    Energy Intake
    Fatty Acids
    Feeding Behavior
    Female
    Humans
    Interferon-gamma
    Interleukin-12
    Interleukin-6
    Intra-Abdominal Fat
    Liver
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
    Obesity
    Overweight
    Oxidative Stress
    Prospective Studies
    Triglycerides
    Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25353663

    Citation

    Marina, Anna, et al. "Effects of Dietary Fat and Saturated Fat Content On Liver Fat and Markers of Oxidative Stress in Overweight/obese Men and Women Under Weight-stable Conditions." Nutrients, vol. 6, no. 11, 2014, pp. 4678-90.
    Marina A, von Frankenberg AD, Suvag S, et al. Effects of dietary fat and saturated fat content on liver fat and markers of oxidative stress in overweight/obese men and women under weight-stable conditions. Nutrients. 2014;6(11):4678-90.
    Marina, A., von Frankenberg, A. D., Suvag, S., Callahan, H. S., Kratz, M., Richards, T. L., & Utzschneider, K. M. (2014). Effects of dietary fat and saturated fat content on liver fat and markers of oxidative stress in overweight/obese men and women under weight-stable conditions. Nutrients, 6(11), pp. 4678-90. doi:10.3390/nu6114678.
    Marina A, et al. Effects of Dietary Fat and Saturated Fat Content On Liver Fat and Markers of Oxidative Stress in Overweight/obese Men and Women Under Weight-stable Conditions. Nutrients. 2014 Oct 28;6(11):4678-90. PubMed PMID: 25353663.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of dietary fat and saturated fat content on liver fat and markers of oxidative stress in overweight/obese men and women under weight-stable conditions. AU - Marina,Anna, AU - von Frankenberg,Anize Delfino, AU - Suvag,Seda, AU - Callahan,Holly S, AU - Kratz,Mario, AU - Richards,Todd L, AU - Utzschneider,Kristina M, Y1 - 2014/10/28/ PY - 2014/08/13/received PY - 2014/10/13/revised PY - 2014/10/16/accepted PY - 2014/10/30/entrez PY - 2014/10/30/pubmed PY - 2015/7/15/medline SP - 4678 EP - 90 JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 6 IS - 11 N2 - Dietary fat and oxidative stress are hypothesized to contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and progression to steatohepatitis. To determine the effects of dietary fat content on hepatic triglyceride, body fat distribution and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, overweight/obese subjects with normal glucose tolerance consumed a control diet (CONT: 35% fat/12% saturated fat/47% carbohydrate) for ten days, followed by four weeks on a low fat (LFD (n = 10): 20% fat/8% saturated fat/62% carbohydrate) or high fat diet (HFD (n = 10): 55% fat/25% saturated fat/27% carbohydrate). Hepatic triglyceride content was quantified by MRS and abdominal fat distribution by MRI. Fasting biomarkers of inflammation (plasma hsCRP, IL-6, IL-12, TNFα, IFN-γ) and oxidative stress (urinary F2-α isoprostanes) were measured. Body weight remained stable. Compared to the CONT, hepatic triglyceride decreased on the LFD (mean (95% CI): change -2.13% (-3.74%, -0.52%)), but did not change on the HFD and there was no significant difference between the LFD and HFD. Intra-abdominal fat did not change significantly on either diet, but subcutaneous abdominal fat increased on the HFD. There were no significant changes in fasting metabolic markers, inflammatory markers and urinary F2-α isoprostanes. We conclude that in otherwise healthy overweight/obese adults under weight-neutral conditions, a diet low in fat and saturated fat has modest effects to decrease liver fat and may be beneficial. On the other hand, a diet very high in fat and saturated fat had no effect on hepatic triglyceride or markers of metabolism, inflammation and oxidative stress. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25353663/Effects_of_dietary_fat_and_saturated_fat_content_on_liver_fat_and_markers_of_oxidative_stress_in_overweight/obese_men_and_women_under_weight_stable_conditions_ L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu6114678 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -