Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Mexican American Men's Experience of Living With Tuberculosis on the U.S.-Mexico Border.
Am J Mens Health. 2016 Jan; 10(1):32-8.AJ

Abstract

The Texas-Mexico border incidence rate of tuberculosis (TB) is 10 times the rate of TB in the United States. Additionally, this area is plagued by antibiotic-resistant TB at a rate that is 70% higher among those living along the border than among nonborder residents. Both the high rate of TB and the emergence of drug-resistant TB increases the importance of controlling TB along the U.S.-Mexico border. Men have higher rates of TB than women, which can be attributed to biological differences and increased environmental exposure. The purpose of this article is to describe the experience of TB for Mexican American men living on the Texas-Mexico border. This a qualitative descriptive study, using participants from a larger study. A purposeful sample was recruited through two south Texas TB clinics. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and translated into English. Data analysis consisted of line-by-line coding, labeling, organizing, and discovering common codes to describe participants' experience of TB and TB treatment. The participants include 13 Mexican American men. Ages ranged from 22 to 76 years. Only one participant was employed during treatment. Years of education ranged from no school to an associate's degree. Five themes were discovered: misinformation, delayed diagnosis, stigma, depression, and loss of community. Participants without social support were further isolated and felt a greater burden of treatment. Two participants contemplated suicide and two others told their families to leave them because they were a burden and infectious. The burden of treatment on the patient is great, especially for Hispanic men.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA julie.zuniga@emory.edu.University of Texas at Austin, TX, USA.University of Texas at Austin, TX, USA.University of Texas at Austin, TX, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25359869

Citation

Zuñiga, Julie Ann, et al. "Mexican American Men's Experience of Living With Tuberculosis On the U.S.-Mexico Border." American Journal of Men's Health, vol. 10, no. 1, 2016, pp. 32-8.
Zuñiga JA, Muñoz S, Johnson MZ, et al. Mexican American Men's Experience of Living With Tuberculosis on the U.S.-Mexico Border. Am J Mens Health. 2016;10(1):32-8.
Zuñiga, J. A., Muñoz, S., Johnson, M. Z., & García, A. A. (2016). Mexican American Men's Experience of Living With Tuberculosis on the U.S.-Mexico Border. American Journal of Men's Health, 10(1), 32-8. https://doi.org/10.1177/1557988314555359
Zuñiga JA, et al. Mexican American Men's Experience of Living With Tuberculosis On the U.S.-Mexico Border. Am J Mens Health. 2016;10(1):32-8. PubMed PMID: 25359869.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mexican American Men's Experience of Living With Tuberculosis on the U.S.-Mexico Border. AU - Zuñiga,Julie Ann, AU - Muñoz,Silvia, AU - Johnson,Mary Zuñiga, AU - García,Alexandra A, Y1 - 2014/10/30/ PY - 2014/11/1/entrez PY - 2014/11/2/pubmed PY - 2016/9/13/medline KW - male caregivers KW - men of color KW - population-based KW - qualitative research KW - social determinants of health SP - 32 EP - 8 JF - American journal of men's health JO - Am J Mens Health VL - 10 IS - 1 N2 - The Texas-Mexico border incidence rate of tuberculosis (TB) is 10 times the rate of TB in the United States. Additionally, this area is plagued by antibiotic-resistant TB at a rate that is 70% higher among those living along the border than among nonborder residents. Both the high rate of TB and the emergence of drug-resistant TB increases the importance of controlling TB along the U.S.-Mexico border. Men have higher rates of TB than women, which can be attributed to biological differences and increased environmental exposure. The purpose of this article is to describe the experience of TB for Mexican American men living on the Texas-Mexico border. This a qualitative descriptive study, using participants from a larger study. A purposeful sample was recruited through two south Texas TB clinics. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and translated into English. Data analysis consisted of line-by-line coding, labeling, organizing, and discovering common codes to describe participants' experience of TB and TB treatment. The participants include 13 Mexican American men. Ages ranged from 22 to 76 years. Only one participant was employed during treatment. Years of education ranged from no school to an associate's degree. Five themes were discovered: misinformation, delayed diagnosis, stigma, depression, and loss of community. Participants without social support were further isolated and felt a greater burden of treatment. Two participants contemplated suicide and two others told their families to leave them because they were a burden and infectious. The burden of treatment on the patient is great, especially for Hispanic men. SN - 1557-9891 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25359869/Mexican_American_Men's_Experience_of_Living_With_Tuberculosis_on_the_U_S__Mexico_Border_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1557988314555359?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -