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Clinical & biochemical profile of trichinellosis outbreak in north India.
Indian J Med Res 2014; 140(3):414-9IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES

Trichinellosis is a parasitic infection caused by Trichinella nematodes, acquired from consumption of raw meat. However, data from Indian subcontinent are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and biochemical profile of a suspected trichinellosis outbreak in a village in Tehri Garhwal district of Uttarakhand state in north India.

METHODS

Three index cases presenting as acute febrile myalgia syndrome with eosinophilia, after consumption of uncooked pork in a common feast, were confirmed as trichinellosis on muscle biopsy. A detailed epidemiological survey was carried out in the affected community and all the people who participated in the feast were investigated for clinical and biochemical profile.

RESULTS

A total of 54 patients were evaluated in the study. The type of pork consumed included uncooked in 24 per cent (n=13), open fire roasted in 39 per cent (n=21) and fried in 37 per cent (n=20). Clinical symptoms were found in those who consumed pork in uncooked or open fire roasted form (n=34). These included fever with chills and myalgia (100%), periorbital oedema (67%), dyspnoea (9%), and dysphagia (3%). Laboratory parameters studied in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients showed eosinophilia in 90 per cent (n=41), raised ESR in 98 per cent (n=45), and an elevated creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) level in 85 per cent (n=39). All symptomatic patients were treated with a short course of oral steroids and albendazole therapy.

CONCLUSIONS

Trichinella infection is not uncommon in India, and should be suspected in case of acute febrile myalgia especially in areas, where habits of consumption of raw meat is more prevalent.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College & Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, India.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25366210

Citation

Sharma, Rahul K., et al. "Clinical & Biochemical Profile of Trichinellosis Outbreak in North India." The Indian Journal of Medical Research, vol. 140, no. 3, 2014, pp. 414-9.
Sharma RK, Raghavendra N, Mohanty S, et al. Clinical & biochemical profile of trichinellosis outbreak in north India. Indian J Med Res. 2014;140(3):414-9.
Sharma, R. K., Raghavendra, N., Mohanty, S., Tripathi, B. K., Gupta, B., & Goel, A. (2014). Clinical & biochemical profile of trichinellosis outbreak in north India. The Indian Journal of Medical Research, 140(3), pp. 414-9.
Sharma RK, et al. Clinical & Biochemical Profile of Trichinellosis Outbreak in North India. Indian J Med Res. 2014;140(3):414-9. PubMed PMID: 25366210.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical & biochemical profile of trichinellosis outbreak in north India. AU - Sharma,Rahul K, AU - Raghavendra,N, AU - Mohanty,Smita, AU - Tripathi,Brijendra K, AU - Gupta,B, AU - Goel,Ankita, PY - 2014/11/5/entrez PY - 2014/11/5/pubmed PY - 2015/8/22/medline SP - 414 EP - 9 JF - The Indian journal of medical research JO - Indian J. Med. Res. VL - 140 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Trichinellosis is a parasitic infection caused by Trichinella nematodes, acquired from consumption of raw meat. However, data from Indian subcontinent are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and biochemical profile of a suspected trichinellosis outbreak in a village in Tehri Garhwal district of Uttarakhand state in north India. METHODS: Three index cases presenting as acute febrile myalgia syndrome with eosinophilia, after consumption of uncooked pork in a common feast, were confirmed as trichinellosis on muscle biopsy. A detailed epidemiological survey was carried out in the affected community and all the people who participated in the feast were investigated for clinical and biochemical profile. RESULTS: A total of 54 patients were evaluated in the study. The type of pork consumed included uncooked in 24 per cent (n=13), open fire roasted in 39 per cent (n=21) and fried in 37 per cent (n=20). Clinical symptoms were found in those who consumed pork in uncooked or open fire roasted form (n=34). These included fever with chills and myalgia (100%), periorbital oedema (67%), dyspnoea (9%), and dysphagia (3%). Laboratory parameters studied in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients showed eosinophilia in 90 per cent (n=41), raised ESR in 98 per cent (n=45), and an elevated creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) level in 85 per cent (n=39). All symptomatic patients were treated with a short course of oral steroids and albendazole therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Trichinella infection is not uncommon in India, and should be suspected in case of acute febrile myalgia especially in areas, where habits of consumption of raw meat is more prevalent. SN - 0971-5916 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25366210/Clinical_&_biochemical_profile_of_trichinellosis_outbreak_in_north_India_ L2 - http://www.ijmr.org.in/article.asp?issn=0971-5916;year=2014;volume=140;issue=3;spage=414;epage=419;aulast=Sharma DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -