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Affiliation and control in marital interaction: interpersonal complementarity is present but is not associated with affect or relationship quality.
Pers Soc Psychol Bull 2015; 41(1):35-51PS

Abstract

The principle of complementarity in interpersonal theory states that an actor's behavior tends to "pull, elicit, invite, or evoke" responses from interaction partners who are similar in affiliation (i.e., warmth vs. hostility) and opposite in control (i.e., dominance vs. submissiveness). Furthermore, complementary interactions are proposed to evoke less negative affect and promote greater relationship satisfaction. These predictions were examined in two studies of married couples. Results suggest that complementarity in affiliation describes a robust general pattern of marital interaction, but complementarity in control varies across contexts. Consistent with behavioral models of marital interaction, greater levels of affiliation and lower control by partners-not complementarity in affiliation or control-were associated with less anger and anxiety and greater relationship quality. Partners' levels of affiliation and control combined in ways other than complementarity-mostly additively, but sometimes synergistically-to predict negative affect and relationship satisfaction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA jennycundiff@gmail.com tim.smith@psych.utah.edu.University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA.University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA.University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA.University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25367005

Citation

Cundiff, Jenny M., et al. "Affiliation and Control in Marital Interaction: Interpersonal Complementarity Is Present but Is Not Associated With Affect or Relationship Quality." Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, vol. 41, no. 1, 2015, pp. 35-51.
Cundiff JM, Smith TW, Butner J, et al. Affiliation and control in marital interaction: interpersonal complementarity is present but is not associated with affect or relationship quality. Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2015;41(1):35-51.
Cundiff, J. M., Smith, T. W., Butner, J., Critchfield, K. L., & Nealey-Moore, J. (2015). Affiliation and control in marital interaction: interpersonal complementarity is present but is not associated with affect or relationship quality. Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, 41(1), pp. 35-51. doi:10.1177/0146167214557002.
Cundiff JM, et al. Affiliation and Control in Marital Interaction: Interpersonal Complementarity Is Present but Is Not Associated With Affect or Relationship Quality. Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2015;41(1):35-51. PubMed PMID: 25367005.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Affiliation and control in marital interaction: interpersonal complementarity is present but is not associated with affect or relationship quality. AU - Cundiff,Jenny M, AU - Smith,Timothy W, AU - Butner,Jonathan, AU - Critchfield,Kenneth L, AU - Nealey-Moore,Jill, Y1 - 2014/11/03/ PY - 2014/11/5/entrez PY - 2014/11/5/pubmed PY - 2015/8/15/medline KW - agency KW - communion KW - complementarity KW - interpersonal processes KW - marriage SP - 35 EP - 51 JF - Personality & social psychology bulletin JO - Pers Soc Psychol Bull VL - 41 IS - 1 N2 - The principle of complementarity in interpersonal theory states that an actor's behavior tends to "pull, elicit, invite, or evoke" responses from interaction partners who are similar in affiliation (i.e., warmth vs. hostility) and opposite in control (i.e., dominance vs. submissiveness). Furthermore, complementary interactions are proposed to evoke less negative affect and promote greater relationship satisfaction. These predictions were examined in two studies of married couples. Results suggest that complementarity in affiliation describes a robust general pattern of marital interaction, but complementarity in control varies across contexts. Consistent with behavioral models of marital interaction, greater levels of affiliation and lower control by partners-not complementarity in affiliation or control-were associated with less anger and anxiety and greater relationship quality. Partners' levels of affiliation and control combined in ways other than complementarity-mostly additively, but sometimes synergistically-to predict negative affect and relationship satisfaction. SN - 1552-7433 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25367005/Affiliation_and_control_in_marital_interaction:_interpersonal_complementarity_is_present_but_is_not_associated_with_affect_or_relationship_quality_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0146167214557002?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -