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In vitro enzymic hydrolysis of chlorogenic acids in coffee.
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2015 Feb; 59(2):231-9.MN

Abstract

SCOPE

Coffee is rich in quinic acid esters of phenolic acids (chlorogenic acids) but also contains some free phenolic acids. A proportion of phenolic acids appear in the blood rapidly after coffee consumption due to absorption in the small intestine. We investigated in vitro whether this appearance could potentially be derived from free phenolic acids in instant coffee or from hydrolysis of chlorogenic acids by pancreatic or brush border enzymes.

METHODS AND RESULTS

We quantified six free phenolic acids in instant coffees using HPLC-DAD-mass spectrometry. The highest was caffeic acid, but all were present at low levels compared to the chlorogenic acids. Roasting and decaffeination significantly reduced free phenolic acid content. We estimated, using pharmacokinetic modelling with previously published data, that the contribution of these compounds to small intestinal absorption is minimal. Hydrolysis of certain chlorogenic acids was observed with human-differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers and with porcine pancreatin, which showed maximal rates on 3- and 5-O-caffeoylquinic acids, respectively.

CONCLUSION

The amounts of certain free phenolic acids in coffee could only minimally account for small intestinal absorption based on modelling. The hydrolysis of caffeoylquinic, but not feruloylquinic acids, by enterocyte and pancreatic esterases is potentially a contributing mechanism to small intestinal absorption.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25380542

Citation

da Encarnação, Joana Amarante, et al. "In Vitro Enzymic Hydrolysis of Chlorogenic Acids in Coffee." Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, vol. 59, no. 2, 2015, pp. 231-9.
da Encarnação JA, Farrell TL, Ryder A, et al. In vitro enzymic hydrolysis of chlorogenic acids in coffee. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2015;59(2):231-9.
da Encarnação, J. A., Farrell, T. L., Ryder, A., Kraut, N. U., & Williamson, G. (2015). In vitro enzymic hydrolysis of chlorogenic acids in coffee. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 59(2), 231-9. https://doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.201400498
da Encarnação JA, et al. In Vitro Enzymic Hydrolysis of Chlorogenic Acids in Coffee. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2015;59(2):231-9. PubMed PMID: 25380542.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - In vitro enzymic hydrolysis of chlorogenic acids in coffee. AU - da Encarnação,Joana Amarante, AU - Farrell,Tracy L, AU - Ryder,Alexandra, AU - Kraut,Nicolai U, AU - Williamson,Gary, Y1 - 2014/12/08/ PY - 2014/07/22/received PY - 2014/10/14/revised PY - 2014/10/17/accepted PY - 2014/11/8/entrez PY - 2014/11/8/pubmed PY - 2015/10/10/medline KW - Caco-2 cells KW - Human plasma KW - Instant coffee KW - Pancreatic digestion KW - Phenolic acids SP - 231 EP - 9 JF - Molecular nutrition & food research JO - Mol Nutr Food Res VL - 59 IS - 2 N2 - SCOPE: Coffee is rich in quinic acid esters of phenolic acids (chlorogenic acids) but also contains some free phenolic acids. A proportion of phenolic acids appear in the blood rapidly after coffee consumption due to absorption in the small intestine. We investigated in vitro whether this appearance could potentially be derived from free phenolic acids in instant coffee or from hydrolysis of chlorogenic acids by pancreatic or brush border enzymes. METHODS AND RESULTS: We quantified six free phenolic acids in instant coffees using HPLC-DAD-mass spectrometry. The highest was caffeic acid, but all were present at low levels compared to the chlorogenic acids. Roasting and decaffeination significantly reduced free phenolic acid content. We estimated, using pharmacokinetic modelling with previously published data, that the contribution of these compounds to small intestinal absorption is minimal. Hydrolysis of certain chlorogenic acids was observed with human-differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers and with porcine pancreatin, which showed maximal rates on 3- and 5-O-caffeoylquinic acids, respectively. CONCLUSION: The amounts of certain free phenolic acids in coffee could only minimally account for small intestinal absorption based on modelling. The hydrolysis of caffeoylquinic, but not feruloylquinic acids, by enterocyte and pancreatic esterases is potentially a contributing mechanism to small intestinal absorption. SN - 1613-4133 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25380542/In_vitro_enzymic_hydrolysis_of_chlorogenic_acids_in_coffee_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.201400498 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -