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Acute Coronary Syndrome in Indian Subcontinent Patients Residing in the Middle East: Results From Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events II.
Angiology. 2015 Oct; 66(9):818-25.A

Abstract

We compared baseline characteristics, clinical presentation, and in-hospital outcomes between Middle Eastern Arabs and Indian subcontinent patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Of the 7930 patients enrolled in Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events II (RACE II), 23% (n = 1669) were from the Indian subcontinent. The Indian subcontinent patients, in comparison with the Middle Eastern Arabs, were younger (49 vs 60 years; P < .001), more were males (96% vs 80%; P < .001), had lower proportion of higher Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events risk score (8% vs 27%; P < .001), and less likely to be associated with diabetes (34% vs 42%; P < .001), hypertension (36% vs 51%; P < .001), and hyperlipidemia (29% vs 39%; P < .001) but more likely to be smokers (55% vs 29%; P < .001). After multivariable adjustment, the Middle Eastern Arabs were less likely to be associated with in-hospital congestive heart failure (odds ratio [OR], 0.65; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.50-0.86; P = .003) but more likely to be associated with recurrent ischemia (OR 1.33; 95% CI: 1.03-1.71; P = .026) when compared to the Indian subcontinent patients. Despite the baseline differences, there were largely no significant differences in in-hospital outcomes between the Indians and the Middle Eastern Arabs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cardiology, Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman.Department of Cardiology, Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman.Department of Pharmacology & Clinical Pharmacy, College of Medicine & Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman Gulf Health Research, Muscat, Oman ial_zakwani@yahoo.com.Department of Cardiac Sciences, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.Department of Cardiac Sciences, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.Department of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery, Hamad General Hospital & Weill Cornell Medical College, Doha, Qatar.Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.Heart & Vascular Institute, Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.Saud Al Babtain Cardiac Centre, Dammam, Saudi Arabia.Department of Cardiac Sciences, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.Non-Communicable Diseases Surveillance and Control, Ministry of Health, Muscat, Oman.Department of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery, Hamad General Hospital & Weill Cornell Medical College, Doha, Qatar.Faculty of Medicine, Sana'a University, Sana'a, Yemen.Department of Cardiology, Mohammed Bin Khalifa Cardiac Centre, Bahrain.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25381144

Citation

Panduranga, Prashanth, et al. "Acute Coronary Syndrome in Indian Subcontinent Patients Residing in the Middle East: Results From Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events II." Angiology, vol. 66, no. 9, 2015, pp. 818-25.
Panduranga P, Sulaiman KJ, Al-Zakwani I, et al. Acute Coronary Syndrome in Indian Subcontinent Patients Residing in the Middle East: Results From Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events II. Angiology. 2015;66(9):818-25.
Panduranga, P., Sulaiman, K. J., Al-Zakwani, I., Alhabib, K. F., Hersi, A., Suwaidi, J. A., Alsheikh-Ali, A. A., Almahmeed, W., Saif, S. A., Al-Faleh, H., Al-Lawati, J., Asaad, N., Al-Motarreb, A., & Amin, H. (2015). Acute Coronary Syndrome in Indian Subcontinent Patients Residing in the Middle East: Results From Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events II. Angiology, 66(9), 818-25. https://doi.org/10.1177/0003319714556812
Panduranga P, et al. Acute Coronary Syndrome in Indian Subcontinent Patients Residing in the Middle East: Results From Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events II. Angiology. 2015;66(9):818-25. PubMed PMID: 25381144.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acute Coronary Syndrome in Indian Subcontinent Patients Residing in the Middle East: Results From Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events II. AU - Panduranga,Prashanth, AU - Sulaiman,Kadhim J, AU - Al-Zakwani,Ibrahim, AU - Alhabib,Khalid F, AU - Hersi,Ahmad, AU - Suwaidi,Jassim Al, AU - Alsheikh-Ali,Alawi A, AU - Almahmeed,Wael, AU - Saif,Shukri Al, AU - Al-Faleh,Hussam, AU - Al-Lawati,Jawad, AU - Asaad,Nidal, AU - Al-Motarreb,Ahmed, AU - Amin,Haitham, Y1 - 2014/11/06/ PY - 2014/11/9/entrez PY - 2014/11/9/pubmed PY - 2015/12/15/medline KW - Arabs KW - Indian subcontinent KW - Middle East KW - South Asians KW - acute coronary syndrome SP - 818 EP - 25 JF - Angiology JO - Angiology VL - 66 IS - 9 N2 - We compared baseline characteristics, clinical presentation, and in-hospital outcomes between Middle Eastern Arabs and Indian subcontinent patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Of the 7930 patients enrolled in Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events II (RACE II), 23% (n = 1669) were from the Indian subcontinent. The Indian subcontinent patients, in comparison with the Middle Eastern Arabs, were younger (49 vs 60 years; P < .001), more were males (96% vs 80%; P < .001), had lower proportion of higher Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events risk score (8% vs 27%; P < .001), and less likely to be associated with diabetes (34% vs 42%; P < .001), hypertension (36% vs 51%; P < .001), and hyperlipidemia (29% vs 39%; P < .001) but more likely to be smokers (55% vs 29%; P < .001). After multivariable adjustment, the Middle Eastern Arabs were less likely to be associated with in-hospital congestive heart failure (odds ratio [OR], 0.65; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.50-0.86; P = .003) but more likely to be associated with recurrent ischemia (OR 1.33; 95% CI: 1.03-1.71; P = .026) when compared to the Indian subcontinent patients. Despite the baseline differences, there were largely no significant differences in in-hospital outcomes between the Indians and the Middle Eastern Arabs. SN - 1940-1574 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25381144/Acute_Coronary_Syndrome_in_Indian_Subcontinent_Patients_Residing_in_the_Middle_East:_Results_From_Gulf_Registry_of_Acute_Coronary_Events_II_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0003319714556812?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -