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Whole plant foods intake is associated with fewer menopausal symptoms in Chinese postmenopausal women with prehypertension or untreated hypertension.
Menopause 2015; 22(5):496-504M

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Nutritional factors have been suggested to be associated with menopausal symptoms (MS). However, the role of overall diet in MS has seldom been examined in Asian populations. This study aims to examine the association of dietary patterns with MS in Chinese postmenopausal women.

METHODS

This was a cross-sectional study of 726 women with prehypertension or untreated hypertension who attended the screening visit for a soy trial. Dietary data were collected using a validated food frequency questionnaire containing 85 food items. Principal components factor analysis was used to derive dietary patterns based on 11 food groups. Factors were rotated by orthogonal transformation. Menopause-related symptoms were assessed by a 20-item validated and structured checklist.

RESULTS

Three dietary patterns were identified: processed foods, whole plant foods, and animal foods. Higher tertile of whole plant foods (P for trend <0.05) or lower tertile of processed foods (P for trend <0.05) was associated with fewer MS in a dose-dependent manner. Multivariate linear regression analyses showed that whole plant foods scores were negatively associated with MS scores, even after adjustments for a range of potential confounders (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analyses showed that whole plant foods intake was associated with a significant reduction in risk for nonvasomotor symptoms only.

CONCLUSIONS

Our study demonstrates that high intake of whole plant foods is independently associated with fewer nonspecific MS. Further evidence from well-designed prospective studies is required to confirm this finding.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the 1Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR; 2Division of Epidemiology, The Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR; and 3Department of Sports Science and Physical Education, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25387345

Citation

Liu, Zhao-Min, et al. "Whole Plant Foods Intake Is Associated With Fewer Menopausal Symptoms in Chinese Postmenopausal Women With Prehypertension or Untreated Hypertension." Menopause (New York, N.Y.), vol. 22, no. 5, 2015, pp. 496-504.
Liu ZM, Ho SC, Xie YJ, et al. Whole plant foods intake is associated with fewer menopausal symptoms in Chinese postmenopausal women with prehypertension or untreated hypertension. Menopause. 2015;22(5):496-504.
Liu, Z. M., Ho, S. C., Xie, Y. J., & Woo, J. (2015). Whole plant foods intake is associated with fewer menopausal symptoms in Chinese postmenopausal women with prehypertension or untreated hypertension. Menopause (New York, N.Y.), 22(5), pp. 496-504. doi:10.1097/GME.0000000000000349.
Liu ZM, et al. Whole Plant Foods Intake Is Associated With Fewer Menopausal Symptoms in Chinese Postmenopausal Women With Prehypertension or Untreated Hypertension. Menopause. 2015;22(5):496-504. PubMed PMID: 25387345.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Whole plant foods intake is associated with fewer menopausal symptoms in Chinese postmenopausal women with prehypertension or untreated hypertension. AU - Liu,Zhao-Min, AU - Ho,Suzanne C, AU - Xie,Yao Jie, AU - Woo,Jean, PY - 2014/11/12/entrez PY - 2014/11/12/pubmed PY - 2016/1/13/medline SP - 496 EP - 504 JF - Menopause (New York, N.Y.) JO - Menopause VL - 22 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Nutritional factors have been suggested to be associated with menopausal symptoms (MS). However, the role of overall diet in MS has seldom been examined in Asian populations. This study aims to examine the association of dietary patterns with MS in Chinese postmenopausal women. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of 726 women with prehypertension or untreated hypertension who attended the screening visit for a soy trial. Dietary data were collected using a validated food frequency questionnaire containing 85 food items. Principal components factor analysis was used to derive dietary patterns based on 11 food groups. Factors were rotated by orthogonal transformation. Menopause-related symptoms were assessed by a 20-item validated and structured checklist. RESULTS: Three dietary patterns were identified: processed foods, whole plant foods, and animal foods. Higher tertile of whole plant foods (P for trend <0.05) or lower tertile of processed foods (P for trend <0.05) was associated with fewer MS in a dose-dependent manner. Multivariate linear regression analyses showed that whole plant foods scores were negatively associated with MS scores, even after adjustments for a range of potential confounders (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analyses showed that whole plant foods intake was associated with a significant reduction in risk for nonvasomotor symptoms only. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that high intake of whole plant foods is independently associated with fewer nonspecific MS. Further evidence from well-designed prospective studies is required to confirm this finding. SN - 1530-0374 UR - http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25387345/full_citation L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=25387345 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -