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Isoflavone content and profile comparisons of cooked soybean-rice mixtures: electric rice cooker versus electric pressure rice cooker.
J Agric Food Chem. 2014 Dec 10; 62(49):11862-8.JA

Abstract

This study examined the effects of heat and pressure on the isoflavone content and profiles of soybeans and rice cooked together using an electric rice cooker (ERC) and an electric pressure rice cooker (EPRC). The total isoflavone content of the soybean-rice mixture after ERC and EPRC cooking relative to that before cooking was ∼90% in soybeans and 14-15% in rice. Malonylglucosides decreased by an additional ∼20% in EPRC-cooked soybeans compared to those cooked using the ERC, whereas glucosides increased by an additional ∼15% in EPRC-cooked soybeans compared to those in ERC-cooked soybeans. In particular, malonylgenistin was highly susceptible to isoflavone conversion during soybean-rice cooking. Total genistein and total glycitein contents decreased in soybeans after ERC and EPRC cooking, whereas total daidzein content increased in EPRC-cooked soybeans (p < 0.05). These results may be useful for improving the content of nutraceuticals, such as isoflavones, in soybeans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Applied Bioscience, College of Life and Environmental Science, Konkuk University , Seoul 143-701, Republic of Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25394170

Citation

Chung, Ill-Min, et al. "Isoflavone Content and Profile Comparisons of Cooked Soybean-rice Mixtures: Electric Rice Cooker Versus Electric Pressure Rice Cooker." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 62, no. 49, 2014, pp. 11862-8.
Chung IM, Yu BR, Park I, et al. Isoflavone content and profile comparisons of cooked soybean-rice mixtures: electric rice cooker versus electric pressure rice cooker. J Agric Food Chem. 2014;62(49):11862-8.
Chung, I. M., Yu, B. R., Park, I., & Kim, S. H. (2014). Isoflavone content and profile comparisons of cooked soybean-rice mixtures: electric rice cooker versus electric pressure rice cooker. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 62(49), 11862-8. https://doi.org/10.1021/jf5033944
Chung IM, et al. Isoflavone Content and Profile Comparisons of Cooked Soybean-rice Mixtures: Electric Rice Cooker Versus Electric Pressure Rice Cooker. J Agric Food Chem. 2014 Dec 10;62(49):11862-8. PubMed PMID: 25394170.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Isoflavone content and profile comparisons of cooked soybean-rice mixtures: electric rice cooker versus electric pressure rice cooker. AU - Chung,Ill-Min, AU - Yu,Bo-Ra, AU - Park,Inmyoung, AU - Kim,Seung-Hyun, Y1 - 2014/11/24/ PY - 2014/11/14/entrez PY - 2014/11/14/pubmed PY - 2015/7/29/medline KW - heat treatment KW - isoflavone change KW - mass balance KW - pressure treatment KW - soybean−rice mixture cooking SP - 11862 EP - 8 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 62 IS - 49 N2 - This study examined the effects of heat and pressure on the isoflavone content and profiles of soybeans and rice cooked together using an electric rice cooker (ERC) and an electric pressure rice cooker (EPRC). The total isoflavone content of the soybean-rice mixture after ERC and EPRC cooking relative to that before cooking was ∼90% in soybeans and 14-15% in rice. Malonylglucosides decreased by an additional ∼20% in EPRC-cooked soybeans compared to those cooked using the ERC, whereas glucosides increased by an additional ∼15% in EPRC-cooked soybeans compared to those in ERC-cooked soybeans. In particular, malonylgenistin was highly susceptible to isoflavone conversion during soybean-rice cooking. Total genistein and total glycitein contents decreased in soybeans after ERC and EPRC cooking, whereas total daidzein content increased in EPRC-cooked soybeans (p < 0.05). These results may be useful for improving the content of nutraceuticals, such as isoflavones, in soybeans. SN - 1520-5118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25394170/Isoflavone_content_and_profile_comparisons_of_cooked_soybean_rice_mixtures:_electric_rice_cooker_versus_electric_pressure_rice_cooker_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/jf5033944 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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