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Vitamin E supplementation and mortality in healthy people: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.
Cardiovasc Drugs Ther 2014; 28(6):563-73CD

Abstract

PURPOSE

To evaluate the effect of oral vitamin E supplementation on all-cause mortality in apparently healthy people.

METHODS

A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted on randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with ≥ 6 months of follow up investigating the effect of vitamin E supplementation on healthy adults in developed countries. Electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) and reference lists of trial reports were searched for RCTs published between 1966 and June 2012. Three investigators assessed eligibility of identified trials. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Two investigators independently extracted data according to the criteria.

RESULTS

There were 18 RCTs identified with 142,219 apparently healthy participants (71,116 in vitamin E intervention groups and 71,103 in control groups) that were included in the final analysis. Fixed effect and random effects analysis of the 18 trials revealed that supplementation with vitamin E was not associated with all-cause mortality (relative risk 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.97 - 1.05, p = 0.65). Subgroup analyses by type of vitamin E (natural or synthetic), dose or duration of exposure, study design or quality, and pre-specified mortality outcome showed no association with all-cause mortality.

CONCLUSIONS

The evidence from pooled analysis of 18 randomised controlled trials undertaken in apparently healthy people shows no effect of vitamin E supplementation at a dose of 23-800 IU/day on all-cause mortality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Level 6, Alfred Centre, 99 Commercial Road, Melbourne, 3004, Australia, andrea.curtis@monash.edu.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25398301

Citation

Curtis, Andrea J., et al. "Vitamin E Supplementation and Mortality in Healthy People: a Meta-analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials." Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy, vol. 28, no. 6, 2014, pp. 563-73.
Curtis AJ, Bullen M, Piccenna L, et al. Vitamin E supplementation and mortality in healthy people: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Cardiovasc Drugs Ther. 2014;28(6):563-73.
Curtis, A. J., Bullen, M., Piccenna, L., & McNeil, J. J. (2014). Vitamin E supplementation and mortality in healthy people: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy, 28(6), pp. 563-73. doi:10.1007/s10557-014-6560-7.
Curtis AJ, et al. Vitamin E Supplementation and Mortality in Healthy People: a Meta-analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials. Cardiovasc Drugs Ther. 2014;28(6):563-73. PubMed PMID: 25398301.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin E supplementation and mortality in healthy people: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. AU - Curtis,Andrea J, AU - Bullen,Michael, AU - Piccenna,Loretta, AU - McNeil,John J, PY - 2014/11/16/entrez PY - 2014/11/16/pubmed PY - 2015/8/6/medline SP - 563 EP - 73 JF - Cardiovascular drugs and therapy JO - Cardiovasc Drugs Ther VL - 28 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of oral vitamin E supplementation on all-cause mortality in apparently healthy people. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted on randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with ≥ 6 months of follow up investigating the effect of vitamin E supplementation on healthy adults in developed countries. Electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) and reference lists of trial reports were searched for RCTs published between 1966 and June 2012. Three investigators assessed eligibility of identified trials. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Two investigators independently extracted data according to the criteria. RESULTS: There were 18 RCTs identified with 142,219 apparently healthy participants (71,116 in vitamin E intervention groups and 71,103 in control groups) that were included in the final analysis. Fixed effect and random effects analysis of the 18 trials revealed that supplementation with vitamin E was not associated with all-cause mortality (relative risk 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.97 - 1.05, p = 0.65). Subgroup analyses by type of vitamin E (natural or synthetic), dose or duration of exposure, study design or quality, and pre-specified mortality outcome showed no association with all-cause mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence from pooled analysis of 18 randomised controlled trials undertaken in apparently healthy people shows no effect of vitamin E supplementation at a dose of 23-800 IU/day on all-cause mortality. SN - 1573-7241 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25398301/Vitamin_E_supplementation_and_mortality_in_healthy_people:_a_meta_analysis_of_randomised_controlled_trials_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10557-014-6560-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -