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Pathogenesis and management of the diabetogenic effect of statins: a role for adiponectin and coenzyme Q10?
Curr Atheroscler Rep 2015; 17(1):472CA

Abstract

There is growing evidence to suggest that statin therapy is associated with an increased risk of incident diabetes. The risk for statin-related diabetes depends upon many factors including age, pre-existing diabetic risk, type and potency of statin. Several mechanisms have been suggested for the diabetogenic effects of statins involving processes that alter islet β-cell function, resulting in impaired glucose metabolism. Recent evidence suggests that the association of statin therapy with the development of diabetes may be partly mediated by a statin-induced decrease in circulating adiponectin and coenzyme Q10. The available evidence suggests the benefit of statins in reducing cardiovascular events outweigh the risk of developing diabetes. Moreover, statin therapy does not impair glycemic control in diabetic patients. Expert recommendations for the use of statins in people at risk of developing diabetes have recently been published. However, further research is required to elucidate both the association between statin use and incident diabetes as well as underlying mechanisms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Metabolic Research Centre, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25398645

Citation

Chan, Dick C., et al. "Pathogenesis and Management of the Diabetogenic Effect of Statins: a Role for Adiponectin and Coenzyme Q10?" Current Atherosclerosis Reports, vol. 17, no. 1, 2015, p. 472.
Chan DC, Pang J, Watts GF. Pathogenesis and management of the diabetogenic effect of statins: a role for adiponectin and coenzyme Q10? Curr Atheroscler Rep. 2015;17(1):472.
Chan, D. C., Pang, J., & Watts, G. F. (2015). Pathogenesis and management of the diabetogenic effect of statins: a role for adiponectin and coenzyme Q10? Current Atherosclerosis Reports, 17(1), p. 472. doi:10.1007/s11883-014-0472-7.
Chan DC, Pang J, Watts GF. Pathogenesis and Management of the Diabetogenic Effect of Statins: a Role for Adiponectin and Coenzyme Q10. Curr Atheroscler Rep. 2015;17(1):472. PubMed PMID: 25398645.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pathogenesis and management of the diabetogenic effect of statins: a role for adiponectin and coenzyme Q10? AU - Chan,Dick C, AU - Pang,Jing, AU - Watts,Gerald F, PY - 2014/11/16/entrez PY - 2014/11/16/pubmed PY - 2015/8/19/medline SP - 472 EP - 472 JF - Current atherosclerosis reports JO - Curr Atheroscler Rep VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - There is growing evidence to suggest that statin therapy is associated with an increased risk of incident diabetes. The risk for statin-related diabetes depends upon many factors including age, pre-existing diabetic risk, type and potency of statin. Several mechanisms have been suggested for the diabetogenic effects of statins involving processes that alter islet β-cell function, resulting in impaired glucose metabolism. Recent evidence suggests that the association of statin therapy with the development of diabetes may be partly mediated by a statin-induced decrease in circulating adiponectin and coenzyme Q10. The available evidence suggests the benefit of statins in reducing cardiovascular events outweigh the risk of developing diabetes. Moreover, statin therapy does not impair glycemic control in diabetic patients. Expert recommendations for the use of statins in people at risk of developing diabetes have recently been published. However, further research is required to elucidate both the association between statin use and incident diabetes as well as underlying mechanisms. SN - 1534-6242 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25398645/Pathogenesis_and_management_of_the_diabetogenic_effect_of_statins:_a_role_for_adiponectin_and_coenzyme_Q10 L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11883-014-0472-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -