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Women's autonomy and social support and their associations with infant and young child feeding and nutritional status: community-based survey in rural Nicaragua.
Public Health Nutr. 2015 Aug; 18(11):1979-90.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the associations of women's autonomy and social support with infant and young child feeding practices (including consumption of highly processed snacks and sugar-sweetened beverages) and nutritional status in rural Nicaragua.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study. Feeding practices and children's nutritional status were evaluated according to the WHO guidelines complemented with information on highly processed snacks and sugar-sweetened beverages. Women's autonomy was assessed by a seventeen-item questionnaire covering dimensions of financial independence, household-, child-, reproductive and health-related decision making and freedom of movement. Women's social support was determined using the Duke-UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire. The scores attained were categorized into tertiles.

SETTING

Los Cuatro Santos area, rural Nicaragua.

SUBJECTS

A total of 1371 children 0-35 months of age.

RESULTS

Children of women with the lowest autonomy were more likely to be exclusively breast-fed and continue to be breast-fed, while children of women with middle level of autonomy had better complementary feeding practices. Children of women with the lowest social support were more likely to consume highly processed snacks and/or sugar-sweetened beverages but also be taller.

CONCLUSIONS

While lower levels of autonomy and social support were independently associated with some favourable feeding and nutrition outcomes, this may not indicate a causal relationship but rather that these factors reflect other matters of importance for child care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Department of Women's and Children's Health,International Maternal and Child Health Unit (IMCH),University Hospital,SE-751 85,Uppsala University,Uppsala,Sweden.1Department of Women's and Children's Health,International Maternal and Child Health Unit (IMCH),University Hospital,SE-751 85,Uppsala University,Uppsala,Sweden.2Asociación para el Desarrollo Económico y Social de El Espino (APRODESE),Chinandega,Nicaragua.1Department of Women's and Children's Health,International Maternal and Child Health Unit (IMCH),University Hospital,SE-751 85,Uppsala University,Uppsala,Sweden.3Centre for Health Equity Studies,Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University,Stockholm,Sweden.1Department of Women's and Children's Health,International Maternal and Child Health Unit (IMCH),University Hospital,SE-751 85,Uppsala University,Uppsala,Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25409706

Citation

Ziaei, Shirin, et al. "Women's Autonomy and Social Support and Their Associations With Infant and Young Child Feeding and Nutritional Status: Community-based Survey in Rural Nicaragua." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 18, no. 11, 2015, pp. 1979-90.
Ziaei S, Contreras M, Zelaya Blandón E, et al. Women's autonomy and social support and their associations with infant and young child feeding and nutritional status: community-based survey in rural Nicaragua. Public Health Nutr. 2015;18(11):1979-90.
Ziaei, S., Contreras, M., Zelaya Blandón, E., Persson, L. Å., Hjern, A., & Ekström, E. C. (2015). Women's autonomy and social support and their associations with infant and young child feeding and nutritional status: community-based survey in rural Nicaragua. Public Health Nutrition, 18(11), 1979-90. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980014002468
Ziaei S, et al. Women's Autonomy and Social Support and Their Associations With Infant and Young Child Feeding and Nutritional Status: Community-based Survey in Rural Nicaragua. Public Health Nutr. 2015;18(11):1979-90. PubMed PMID: 25409706.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Women's autonomy and social support and their associations with infant and young child feeding and nutritional status: community-based survey in rural Nicaragua. AU - Ziaei,Shirin, AU - Contreras,Mariela, AU - Zelaya Blandón,Elmer, AU - Persson,Lars-Åke, AU - Hjern,Anders, AU - Ekström,Eva-Charlotte, Y1 - 2014/11/20/ PY - 2014/11/21/entrez PY - 2014/11/21/pubmed PY - 2016/3/30/medline KW - Child feeding and nutrition KW - Nicaragua KW - Social support KW - Women’s autonomy SP - 1979 EP - 90 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 18 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the associations of women's autonomy and social support with infant and young child feeding practices (including consumption of highly processed snacks and sugar-sweetened beverages) and nutritional status in rural Nicaragua. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. Feeding practices and children's nutritional status were evaluated according to the WHO guidelines complemented with information on highly processed snacks and sugar-sweetened beverages. Women's autonomy was assessed by a seventeen-item questionnaire covering dimensions of financial independence, household-, child-, reproductive and health-related decision making and freedom of movement. Women's social support was determined using the Duke-UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire. The scores attained were categorized into tertiles. SETTING: Los Cuatro Santos area, rural Nicaragua. SUBJECTS: A total of 1371 children 0-35 months of age. RESULTS: Children of women with the lowest autonomy were more likely to be exclusively breast-fed and continue to be breast-fed, while children of women with middle level of autonomy had better complementary feeding practices. Children of women with the lowest social support were more likely to consume highly processed snacks and/or sugar-sweetened beverages but also be taller. CONCLUSIONS: While lower levels of autonomy and social support were independently associated with some favourable feeding and nutrition outcomes, this may not indicate a causal relationship but rather that these factors reflect other matters of importance for child care. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25409706/Women's_autonomy_and_social_support_and_their_associations_with_infant_and_young_child_feeding_and_nutritional_status:_community_based_survey_in_rural_Nicaragua_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980014002468/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -