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Caffeine intake and the risk of kidney stones.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Dec; 100(6):1596-603.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although caffeine intake may increase urine calcium excretion, caffeine-containing beverages have been associated with a lower risk of nephrolithiasis.

OBJECTIVE

We sought to determine the association between caffeine intake and the risk of incident kidney stones in 3 large prospective cohorts.

DESIGN

We prospectively analyzed the association between intake of caffeine and incidence of kidney stones in 3 large ongoing cohort studies, the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS) and the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS) I and II. Information on the consumption of caffeine and the incidence of kidney stones was collected by validated questionnaires.

RESULTS

The analysis included 217,883 participants; over a median follow-up of >8 y, 4982 incident cases occurred. After multivariate adjustment for age, BMI, fluid intake, and other factors, participants in the highest quintile of caffeine intake had a 26% (95% CI: 12%, 38%) lower risk of developing stones in the HPFS cohort, a 29% lower risk (95% CI: 15%, 41%) in the NHS I cohort, and a 31% lower risk (95% CI: 18%, 42%) in the NHS II cohort (P-trend < 0.001 for all cohorts). The association remained significant in the subgroup of participants with a low or no intake of caffeinated coffee in the HPFS cohort. Among 6033 participants with 24-h urine data, the intake of caffeine was associated with higher urine volume, calcium, and potassium and with lower urine oxalate and supersaturation for calcium oxalate and uric acid.

CONCLUSION

Caffeine intake is independently associated with a lower risk of incident kidney stones.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Division of Nephrology-Renal Program, Department of Medical Sciences, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy (PMF and GG); the Channing Division of Network Medicine (PMF, ENT, and GCC) and the Renal Division (GCC), Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; and the Division of Nephrology and Transplantation, Maine Medical Center, Portland, ME (ENT).From the Division of Nephrology-Renal Program, Department of Medical Sciences, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy (PMF and GG); the Channing Division of Network Medicine (PMF, ENT, and GCC) and the Renal Division (GCC), Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; and the Division of Nephrology and Transplantation, Maine Medical Center, Portland, ME (ENT).From the Division of Nephrology-Renal Program, Department of Medical Sciences, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy (PMF and GG); the Channing Division of Network Medicine (PMF, ENT, and GCC) and the Renal Division (GCC), Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; and the Division of Nephrology and Transplantation, Maine Medical Center, Portland, ME (ENT).From the Division of Nephrology-Renal Program, Department of Medical Sciences, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy (PMF and GG); the Channing Division of Network Medicine (PMF, ENT, and GCC) and the Renal Division (GCC), Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; and the Division of Nephrology and Transplantation, Maine Medical Center, Portland, ME (ENT).

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25411295

Citation

Ferraro, Pietro Manuel, et al. "Caffeine Intake and the Risk of Kidney Stones." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 100, no. 6, 2014, pp. 1596-603.
Ferraro PM, Taylor EN, Gambaro G, et al. Caffeine intake and the risk of kidney stones. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;100(6):1596-603.
Ferraro, P. M., Taylor, E. N., Gambaro, G., & Curhan, G. C. (2014). Caffeine intake and the risk of kidney stones. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 100(6), 1596-603. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.114.089987
Ferraro PM, et al. Caffeine Intake and the Risk of Kidney Stones. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;100(6):1596-603. PubMed PMID: 25411295.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Caffeine intake and the risk of kidney stones. AU - Ferraro,Pietro Manuel, AU - Taylor,Eric N, AU - Gambaro,Giovanni, AU - Curhan,Gary C, Y1 - 2014/10/01/ PY - 2014/11/21/entrez PY - 2014/11/21/pubmed PY - 2015/2/24/medline KW - caffeine KW - coffee KW - kidney stones KW - nutrition KW - prospective study SP - 1596 EP - 603 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 100 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although caffeine intake may increase urine calcium excretion, caffeine-containing beverages have been associated with a lower risk of nephrolithiasis. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine the association between caffeine intake and the risk of incident kidney stones in 3 large prospective cohorts. DESIGN: We prospectively analyzed the association between intake of caffeine and incidence of kidney stones in 3 large ongoing cohort studies, the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS) and the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS) I and II. Information on the consumption of caffeine and the incidence of kidney stones was collected by validated questionnaires. RESULTS: The analysis included 217,883 participants; over a median follow-up of >8 y, 4982 incident cases occurred. After multivariate adjustment for age, BMI, fluid intake, and other factors, participants in the highest quintile of caffeine intake had a 26% (95% CI: 12%, 38%) lower risk of developing stones in the HPFS cohort, a 29% lower risk (95% CI: 15%, 41%) in the NHS I cohort, and a 31% lower risk (95% CI: 18%, 42%) in the NHS II cohort (P-trend < 0.001 for all cohorts). The association remained significant in the subgroup of participants with a low or no intake of caffeinated coffee in the HPFS cohort. Among 6033 participants with 24-h urine data, the intake of caffeine was associated with higher urine volume, calcium, and potassium and with lower urine oxalate and supersaturation for calcium oxalate and uric acid. CONCLUSION: Caffeine intake is independently associated with a lower risk of incident kidney stones. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25411295/Caffeine_intake_and_the_risk_of_kidney_stones_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.114.089987 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -