Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Biological determinants of spontaneous late preterm and early term birth: a retrospective cohort study.
BJOG. 2015 Mar; 122(4):491-9.BJOG

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Our aim was to examine the association between biological determinants of preterm birth (infection and inflammation, placental ischaemia and other hypoxia, diabetes mellitus, other) and spontaneous late preterm (34-36 weeks) and early term (37-38 weeks) birth.

DESIGN

Retrospective cohort study.

SETTING

City of London and Middlesex County, Canada.

SAMPLE

Singleton live births, delivered at 34-41 weeks to London-Middlesex mothers following spontaneous labour.

METHODS

Data were obtained from a city-wide perinatal database on births between 2002 and 2011 (n = 17,678). Multivariable analyses used multinomial logistic regression.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

The outcome of interest was the occurrence of late preterm (34-36 weeks) and early term (37-38 weeks) birth, compared with full term birth (39-41 weeks).

RESULTS

After controlling for covariates, there were associations between infection and inflammation and late preterm birth (aOR = 2.07, 95% CI 1.65, 2.60); between placental ischaemia and other hypoxia and late preterm (aOR = 2.21, 95% CI 1.88, 2.61) and early term (aOR = 1.25, 95% CI 1.13, 1.39) birth; between diabetes mellitus and late preterm (aOR = 3.89, 95% CI 2.90, 5.21) and early term (aOR = 2.66, 95% CI 2.19, 3.23) birth; and between other biological determinants (polyhydramnios, oligohydramnios) and late preterm (aOR = 2.81, 95% CI 1.70, 4.64) and early term (aOR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.32, 2.70) birth.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings show that delivery following spontaneous labour even close to full term may be a result of pathological processes. Because these biological determinants of preterm birth contribute to an adverse intrauterine environment, they have important implications for fetal and neonatal health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25414127

Citation

Brown, H K., et al. "Biological Determinants of Spontaneous Late Preterm and Early Term Birth: a Retrospective Cohort Study." BJOG : an International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol. 122, no. 4, 2015, pp. 491-9.
Brown HK, Speechley KN, Macnab J, et al. Biological determinants of spontaneous late preterm and early term birth: a retrospective cohort study. BJOG. 2015;122(4):491-9.
Brown, H. K., Speechley, K. N., Macnab, J., Natale, R., & Campbell, M. K. (2015). Biological determinants of spontaneous late preterm and early term birth: a retrospective cohort study. BJOG : an International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 122(4), 491-9. https://doi.org/10.1111/1471-0528.13191
Brown HK, et al. Biological Determinants of Spontaneous Late Preterm and Early Term Birth: a Retrospective Cohort Study. BJOG. 2015;122(4):491-9. PubMed PMID: 25414127.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Biological determinants of spontaneous late preterm and early term birth: a retrospective cohort study. AU - Brown,H K, AU - Speechley,K N, AU - Macnab,J, AU - Natale,R, AU - Campbell,M K, Y1 - 2014/11/21/ PY - 2014/10/05/accepted PY - 2014/11/22/entrez PY - 2014/11/22/pubmed PY - 2015/4/29/medline KW - Obstetric labour KW - pregnancy complications KW - preterm birth KW - term birth SP - 491 EP - 9 JF - BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology JO - BJOG VL - 122 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to examine the association between biological determinants of preterm birth (infection and inflammation, placental ischaemia and other hypoxia, diabetes mellitus, other) and spontaneous late preterm (34-36 weeks) and early term (37-38 weeks) birth. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: City of London and Middlesex County, Canada. SAMPLE: Singleton live births, delivered at 34-41 weeks to London-Middlesex mothers following spontaneous labour. METHODS: Data were obtained from a city-wide perinatal database on births between 2002 and 2011 (n = 17,678). Multivariable analyses used multinomial logistic regression. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The outcome of interest was the occurrence of late preterm (34-36 weeks) and early term (37-38 weeks) birth, compared with full term birth (39-41 weeks). RESULTS: After controlling for covariates, there were associations between infection and inflammation and late preterm birth (aOR = 2.07, 95% CI 1.65, 2.60); between placental ischaemia and other hypoxia and late preterm (aOR = 2.21, 95% CI 1.88, 2.61) and early term (aOR = 1.25, 95% CI 1.13, 1.39) birth; between diabetes mellitus and late preterm (aOR = 3.89, 95% CI 2.90, 5.21) and early term (aOR = 2.66, 95% CI 2.19, 3.23) birth; and between other biological determinants (polyhydramnios, oligohydramnios) and late preterm (aOR = 2.81, 95% CI 1.70, 4.64) and early term (aOR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.32, 2.70) birth. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that delivery following spontaneous labour even close to full term may be a result of pathological processes. Because these biological determinants of preterm birth contribute to an adverse intrauterine environment, they have important implications for fetal and neonatal health. SN - 1471-0528 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25414127/Biological_determinants_of_spontaneous_late_preterm_and_early_term_birth:_a_retrospective_cohort_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/1471-0528.13191 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -